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Theater

A New Take on an Old Play

Theater: ‘The Taming of the Shrew’

Shakespeare & Company creates stupendous theatrical experiences, and its “The Taming of the Shrew,” currently being offered at the Edith Wharton estate, The Mount, is lively and entertaining.
The setting for this energetic presentation of one of Shakespeare’s most widely performed and adapted comedies (think Cole Porter’s “Kiss Me Kate”) is The Dell, a natural amphitheater that the company has made their own with the addition of a platform stage and, depending on the production, simple, colorful, representative set pieces.  

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Notes on the Ice Age, Atlantic City and the Family Mammoth

Theater: ‘The Skin of Our Teeth’

Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize –winning “The Skin of Our Teeth,” currently onstage at Berkshire Theatre Group’s Fitzpatrick Main Stage in Stockbridge, Mass., poses an interesting question.

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Gender Confusion The Shakespeare Way

Theater: ‘Twelfth Night’

The plot of ‘Twelfth Night,” currently on stage at Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, Mass., is really quite simple.
She loves the Duke, but he think’s she’s a he, since she dresses like one after washing up on shore after a boat wreck that she thinks killed her twin brother.  So, he sends her/him to plead his case to the countess he believes he loves ... except the countess then falls in love with him/her thinking it’s he, not she.  

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Pure Musical Magic in Sharon

Theater: ‘Beauty and The Beast’

This is how fairy tales work: You start with heedless cruelty, add danger, evil, ignorance, a daunting forest (most fairy tales have one of those), magic and the notion that love can fix anything. And there you are with a salutary finish. It works every time.
  “Beauty and the Beast” sticks to the formula like gaffer’s tape. And the Sharon Playhouse production makes the 18th-century tale (without a failed seduction and other dispiriting matters) a glittery and joyous thing.

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Rock and Roll Is Here To Stay

Theater: ‘Rock and Roll Man: The Alan Freed Story’

It was the 1950s. America was growing up. Although we were snarled in “The Korean Conflict,” World War II was over. Suburbia was created. The endless rivers of concrete that became the Interstate Highway System rolled — “sea to shining sea.” And, rock and roll was born.

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Beauty and The Beast Opens In Sharon

Theater

Actors (back row, left to right)  Geoffrey Emmett, James Rose and (front row, left to right), Aidan Farren Catellier, Daniel Pahl in rehearsals for “Beauty and The Beast.” The play is based on the Academy Award winning animated feature and is filled with spectacular costumes, dazzling scenery and familiar songs such as “Be Our Guest,” “Belle,” “Gaston” and the well loved title song. The show begins on Friday, July 19 at The Sharon Playhouse. For tickets and information go to www.sharonplayhouse.org.

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An Irish Blessing

Theater: “Outside Mullingar”

It takes only a few brief moments as “Outside Mullingar” unfolds before an appreciative audience at the Berkshire Theatre Group’s Unicorn Theatre for them to realize that they have been transported to Ireland, and the story that is about to unfold is going to be filled with pure Irish magic.

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In ‘The Tempest’ Prospero Can Be A Woman

Theater

Prospero comes in all shapes, sizes and dispositions. The powerful and sometimes vengeful magician in Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” can be athletic, he can be remote, he can be cruel, he can be forgiving.
He can be a woman. 

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The Splendor of Sondheim at Barrington Stage

Theater: ‘Into the Woods’

Its creators are celebrated: Stephen Sondheim for the music and lyrics; James Lapine for the book; Jonathan Tunick for the spare and revealing orchestrations. Barrington Stage Company’s  production of “Into the Woods” is  gorgeous. The actors know what they are about. Some of them, like Mykal Kilgore, who plays the witch, know much more than that.
Still, there are flaws in this production, and, maybe, in every production of “Into the Woods.”

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Celebrating 60 Years Of Local Theater

Theater: A History of The Sharon Playhouse

In the 1930s a group of Sharon residents decided to form a play-reading group for their own enjoyment. Soon, however, it was attracting a neighborhood audience.  This fledgling effort was the first indication that Sharon’s destiny was to become a theater town.

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