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Finding a way to a kinder, gentler death

FALLS VILLAGE — Mortality: It’s the proverbial elephant in the living room that nobody wants to talk about even as it stares you in the face. For Baby Boomers (ages 55 to 73), however, it’s increasingly a topic they can no longer avoid. Lynn Martorell Gumbert wants to help open the conversation.

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The big three: calcium, magnesium, potassium

It’s autumn and you, me and the farmers are all clearing out the last of our produce from the 2019 growing season.
Even the eggplants, tomatoes and cucumbers are pretty much gone. 
Winter squash, however, is coming into its own. And in my garden, the leafy greens are really enjoying the cool, wet autumn weather. 

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If you can’t or won’t eat sugar, here’s a new idea on what to substitute

Sugar substitutes seem to come in and out of fashion and favor. There was Sweet ’n Low and Splenda and stevia and aspartame.
Now there’s erythritol, to which people seem to be attributing magical properties. And they might not be wrong.
In fact, it appears based on the current research that erythritol is a very good product that is generally good for you — or at least, it’s a tasty product that isn’t bad for you. 

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Perhaps this time a miracle will come true

We all love to hear about miracle solutions and wonder drugs but we all (or most of us) are pretty cynical. The words “snake oil” sometimes are whispered. 
This one sounds promising, though (although I offer no guarantees). Brown University in Rhode Island has a research program funded through a government/university/community partnership; it’s called the Superfund Research Program and it seeks to redress some of the extensive environmental contamination inflicted on the state by industry in past centuries.

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Eggplants and why we salt them

One of the really nice things about late-summer tennis is that the players sometimes bestow armloads of their overflow garden vegetables.
In this way, I came into possession recently of a half dozen extremely fresh, beautiful, unblemished eggplants (thank you, Nora and Allen!). 

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In which I justify eating white bread (but it has to be good)

What’s the point of writing about white bread in this glorious summer season of corn and tomatoes and melons and cucumbers and eggplant and on and on?
I’ve been feeling guilty about my consumption levels of white bread and I’ll tell you why in a moment. 
But first, why am I eating white bread at all, especially when there is so much other good stuff to eat? Part of my guilt process is to seek self justification. I’ve been digging deep and trying to figure out why bread is in fact an important part of my diet.

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 Tips for avoiding falls

NORTH CANAAN — Falls are under-reported, according to Mike Mangini, who is director of Outpatient Physical Therapy at Geer in North Canaan. 
Many older people fear if they tell someone they’ve fallen, they will be forced into care and will lose their independence. 

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The sound of summer interns cracking their knuckles

The common sounds of an office include shuffling paper, the whirring of a printer, your colleague’s pesky cough he can’t seem to shake, and (often) the unmistakable sound of someone cracking knuckles. 
That someone might very well be me.
The increasing pressure on my knuckles throughout the day melts away after a sudden “pop.”

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Peachy keen idea for a dairy-free cobbler

Peaches hold the distinction of being the only fruit that, when you search for them on Google, the first results are for a Canadian punk rocker.
The connection seems odd, since peaches, at least to me, evoke peaceful scenes of sitting on my front porch on a summer evening. 
This ironic use is not limited to rockers. Baseball fans will recall that Ty Cobb, who sharpened his spikes to harm opposing players, was known as The Georgia Peach. I would think that the infielders who bore the brunt of Cobb’s wrath did not regard him as a peachy man. 

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Oceans, lakes and a peaceful state of mind

Almost any memorable summer comes with a party, a picnic or some other form of get-together — preferably on a beach, by an ocean or by a lake. 
For me, it’s lakes all the way. I don’t like sand; seaweed is the bane of my mortal existence on this planet; and I would rather be fed to sharks than sit in the car, all sticky from salt water, and drive home two hours from the beach back to my land-locked house in the middle of West Hartford. 

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