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There’s Something About That Swan,

Theater: 'The Swan'
compass@lakevillejournal.com

The second of Chester Theatre Company’s uncommon love stories is Elizabeth Egloff’s “The Swan,” uncommon because this play is about a love affair between Dora and Bill, Bill being the name Dora gives to the great white swan that crashes into her disordered and unhappy prairie home one night.

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Just for the Fun of It

Theater: ‘Altar Boyz’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The musical “Altar Boyz” at TriArts’ Sharon Playhouse is a triumph for five talented young men, a brilliant choreographer, a splendid onstage band and John Simpkins, the director who pulled it all together. In only 90 minutes of sweet, musical parody and gentle satire, “Boyz” manages to charm, surprise and send its audiences out of the theater smiling and laughing.

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Funny Then, Funny Now

Theater: ‘The Imaginary Invalid’

The genius of comedy is that it never changes much. The same things that make us laugh now made people laugh 300 years ago, or a 1,000 years ago. Jokes about sex, marriage, infidelity, body parts, bodily functions and the like are as much in evidence in ancient humor as in an Adam Sandler movie.
Add equal measures of slapstick and verbal jousting (think Marx Brothers and “Who’s on First”) and you have the makings of a classic comedy like Molière’s “The Imaginary Invalid,” a work that perfectly balances broad lunacy and rapier-like wit.

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An Actor Takes on a Magician

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Olympia Dukakis has played lawyers, doctors, a cop, a psychiatric patient, a mother, a variety of ethnic characters and three different women named Rose. Now this Academy-Award winning actor for her role in “Moonstruck” is playing Prospero, turning the powerful magician of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” into a different kind of sorcerer: a woman bent on revenge and securing her daughter’s rights. This is Prospera.

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Next at TriArts: ‘Altar Boyz’

Theater Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Before “The Book of Mormon” aimed its Tony-winning, full-frontal, raunchy humor at Mormonism and religion in general, there was “Altar Boyz,” a sweet-natured, gentle spoof of Christian pop and rock music — the kind played daily on half the radio stations in the South and Southwest. Drawing on the boy band styles of Backstreet Boys, ’N Sync and New Kids on the Block among others, the show was built on sly musical parodies, good dancing and five talented young men.

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For the Fun of It

Theater: ‘Tartuffe the Imposter’

Tartuffe has been residing as a guest in Orgon’s palatial residence; he has convinced his host that he is a pious and somber man. The deceived Orgon, who trusts his apparent friend, decides to betroth his reluctant daughter, Marianne, to Tartuffe. But, naturally, she is deeply in love with Valer.

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It’s All About the Songs

Theater: ‘A Class Act’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Ed Kleban was a difficult man burdened with phobias and psychological problems that sent him to mental hospitals more than once. He was also a prolific composer and brilliant lyricist who best communicated with his friends and the world through his songs. Hundreds and hundreds of songs.

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Hey Kids, Let’s Put on a Show

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Twenty or so years ago, Michael Baldwin produced many shows with singing, dancing and dialog he wrote himself to entertain his parents, their friends and anyone else in the Salisbury neighborhood who liked to see kids practicing stardom.
He played any stage he could get. “I used to stand on a piano bench in my parents’ living room, holding a mock microphone,” he told me.
And he recalls every word of the donkey’s song from the Christmas pageant at St. Mary’s Church when he was 5.

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Hey Kids, Let’s Put on a Show

compass@lakevillejournal.com

Twenty or so years ago, Michael Baldwin produced many shows with singing, dancing and dialog he wrote himself to entertain his parents, their friends and anyone else in the Salisbury neighborhood who liked to see kids practicing stardom.
He played any stage he could get. “I used to stand on a piano bench in my parents’ living room, holding a mock microphone,” he told me.
And he recalls every word of the donkey’s song from the Christmas pageant at St. Mary’s Church when he was 5.

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Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

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About Paper and Creation and Love

Theater: ‘Animals Out of Paper’
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Uncommon love stories. That’s the theme for the season at the Chester Theatre Company out in woodsy Chester, MA, beyond Stockbridge, beyond Lee, beyond Becket. But definitely worth the drive.
“Animals Out of Paper” by Rajif Joseph is not only uncommon in its look at love. It’s funny and a little disturbing. It’s about origami and paper and what folding does to it.

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