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Salisbury

SALISBURY — Salisbury First Selectman Curtis Rand said the town can put up “no parking signs” around the Great Falls in the Amesville section of town to discourage visitors from going into the falls.

Rand was responding to Amesville resident Jeremy Dakin’s comments about the July 30 fatality at the falls, at the regular monthly meeting of the Salisbury Board of Selectmen on Monday, Aug. 5.

First Light, the company that operates the Falls Village hydroelectric facility, is the owner of the land around the falls, and of the boat launch and park on...

Salisbury

No decision yet on special permits

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The Planning and Zoning Commission concluded the public hearing on a proposed amendment to the town’s zoning regulations prohibiting vertical expansions of nonconforming structures in the entire town Tuesday, Sept. 20.
Chairman Michael Klemens kicked off the two-and-a-half hour session by saying that after after talking to commission attorney Chuck Andres it was clear that the commission can issue special permits, that they are not variances.
The next question, added Klemens, is whether expanding a nonconforming building increases nonconformity.

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P&Z copes with nonconformities

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) held two public hearings Tuesday, Sept. 6, on special permit applications for vertical expansion of nonconforming structures.
This is a hot topic in Salisbury. After a public hearing in July, the commission voted 3-2 to impose a six-month moratorium on such expansions within the lake Protection Overlay Zones. At a public hearing Aug. 9 on a proposed change in the town’s zoning regulations that would eliminate special permits for vertical expansion of nonconforming buildings in the entire town, public sentiment was against the idea.

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Two offers for former firehouse

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — A modest-sized but inquisitive crowd skipped a presidential speech and the opening of the professional football season on Thursday, Sept. 8, to attend a public hearing on two possible uses for the old firehouse and the adjacent building.
The hearing was held at Town Hall.
First Selectman Curtis Rand, getting things started, said the job at hand was to get information so that the call can be written for a town meeting where voters will decide what to do with the small brick building and neighboring white clapboard structure on Route 41 near the gas station.

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Rain, rain and Rice on agenda for BOS

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The process of rebuilding the Long Pond dam is underway, despite the recent inordinately wet weather, according to First Selectman Curtis Rand.
Rand reported on dam progress at the monthly meeting of the Board of Selectmen Tuesday, Sept. 6.
A temporary or “coffer” dam  is now in place to keep water in the pond while excavation and rebuilding goes on below.

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What everyone needs to know about the Amazon

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Ethnobotanist and author Mark J. Plotkin speaks on “Rainforest Conservation and the Search for New Jungle Medicines” on Friday, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m. at The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville as part of the Salisbury Forum series.
“Are you interested in clean air? Are you interested in medicines when you’re sick? Are you interested in biodegradable pesticides or organic fertilizers?” asked Plotkin in a brief telephone interview Monday, Sept. 12.
“Then you are interested and have a stake in the preservation of the Amazon.”

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Bank will loan to small businesses

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Salisbury Bank and Trust (SBT) has $16 million available for loans to small businesses.

The bank announced Aug. 25 that it had sold $16 million worth of preferred stock to the U.S. Treasury under the Small Business Lending Fund program, a fund of $30 billion established by the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010.

The idea behind the law is to encourage lending to small businesses by providing access to capital for community banks with assets under $10 billion. (In the world of finance, such a bank is considered “small.”)

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New wheels, new freedom for veteran

publisher@lakevillejournal.com

LIME ROCK — America’s love affair with trucks goes a long way back, and it’s not fading anytime soon. Some proof of that is a new life being given to a 1939 Dodge truck nicknamed “Ducky,” which is undergoing a transformation at Northwest Corner Classic Cars so it can become roadworthy for its owner, William “Willy” Paschal of Middlefield, Mass.
He admittedly fell for Ducky the minute he saw it.
“I wanted a hot rod,” he said. “I knew as soon as I saw this truck, I had to have it. As everybody says who sees it, it’s unique.”

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Tax collector moves on

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — Denise Rice, who began working as Salisbury’s tax collector in 1973, remembers the summer of 1985 very well.
That was the year of the Town Hall fire, which occurred in August. This was also the pre-computer age, when small-town record keeping was done by hand.
“Our office was on the second floor,” said Rice. “It ended up in the basement.”
Rice was in a reminiscing mood Friday, Sept. 2 — her last day on the job, after 38 years.
She recalled that the tax records had to be reconstructed, using deposit slips from Salisbury Bank and Trust, one account at a time.

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Leaping obstacles with the help of polo ponies

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — Brandon Rease, age 16, was working with Billy, who is a polo pony.
The word “pony” is misleading. Billy, a full-sized horse who used to race, had Billy running around a circular enclosure at the Gomez farm on Wells Hill Road last week.
The goal was to remind Billy that “I am in control,” Brandon said. “When I want him to do something, he does it.”
The horse was jogging along counter-clockwise. At a word from Brandon, Billy turned on a dime and went back in the other direction.

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Fact or fiction?

Discovering the real story of ‘The Help’
tarak@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — Anyone who has read “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett, or has seen the new movie version will no doubt wonder how much of the story is true.
Set in Jackson, Miss., during the early 1960s, it chronicles to some degree the growth of the civil rights movement, through the lens of the upper-class white women in the town and the black maids who serve them and care for them and their families.

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