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Leon Graham

Disorder in the court!

Movies: ‘Closed Circuit’

“Closed Circuit” should be a terrific movie: Great cast, London setting, terrorist bombing, quick arrest of the mastermind and both public and secret trials. It should crackle with energy and contemporary relevance. Yet after a terrific opening, the film bogs down in legal procedure, punctuated by increasingly violent and largely implausible actions of MI5, the U.K.'s internal secret service.

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About Inness, And Man And Nature

The Art Scene

George Inness was a slow bloomer. While he had little formal training, on trips to France and Italy he studied the old masters and the contemporary Barbizon painters, with their emphasis on realism and soft tonalities. But his greatest work came in the last decade or so of his life, and when he died he was acknowledged as this country’s greatest landscape painter, both influential and controversial.

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A Tale of Fathers and Sons

Movies: ‘The Place Beyond the Pines’

Recalling Orson Welles’s “Touch of Evil,” “The Place Beyond the Pines” opens with a bravura tracking shot. The camera follows Luke (Ryan Gosling) as he walks from his tent through a crowded midway to a larger tent, climbs on his motorcycle and drives it into a steel ribbed sphere where he and two other performers race around and upside down without ever crashing. It is ominous and riveting.

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Imaginative, Compelling Art

The Art Scene

Sohn Fine Art’s second annual juried photography exhibition has something for everyone, even a chicken foot.
The foot, exsanguinated and scaled and wrinkled, lies on thick folds of white cloth or toweling, its claws emphasized against the pale background. Anne Mourier-Defalco has made something ominous and frightening. Equally ominous I think is Gene Elling’s “Industrial Lullaby,” with its pristine baby crib in the midst of a dark, dirty auto mechanics garage where a Volkswagen sits brooding on a lift.

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Experiencing Art The Barnes Way

The Art Scene

The Barnes Foundation, that incomparable collection of paintings, artifacts, furniture and all sorts of hand-crafted objects, moved to its new and controversial home in central Philadelphia in May 2012. It left behind the Merion mansion Albert C. Barnes, physician and self-made millionaire, built to house his collection and shield it from the art establishment he hated. The art now resides within a tasteful, rectilinear building designed by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.

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