Login

Jenny Hansell

Growing up English And Fearing The Bomb

Movies: ‘Ginger and Rosa’

What we have here are two girls, best friends from birth, bonded since their mothers clasped each others’ hands during childbirth at the end of World War II.
Written and directed by Sally Potter, who drew from her own memories growing up in England in the shadow of the bomb, “Ginger and Rosa” reveals the inner workings of female friendship and the helplessness — and manipulations — of adolescence.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Repressing Adolescents, ’Twas Ever Thus

Theater: ‘Spring Awakening’

The musical now playing at the Center for Performing Arts in Rhinebeck doesn’t recycle old pop songs or recreate them. It doesn’t tell an uplifting tale of triumph over adversity, and it’s definitely not for children. But it’s well worth seeing for its haunting music, beautiful staging and fascinating theme.
It’s the story of a group of repressed teenagers in 19th-century Germany, discovering their sexual feelings and the consquences of acting on them.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Following the Plot, Jude Law Notwithstanding

Movies: ‘Side Effects’

Steven Soderbergh’s latest, and, possibly, last, movie (he’s announced his retirement to become a painter) is a pharmaceutical thriller. It dryly and matter-of-factly skewers our antidepressant hungry culture, asks who is at fault when a medicated patient goes haywire and allows the audience to indulge at length in the wonder that is Jude Law.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.