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Tangled Lines

Smallmouth, dead drift, white flies

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I am a trout snob. I admit it freely.
And when the weather gets warm, water temperatures in the Housatonic rise, and the trout go on vacation, I generally head to the consistently cold waters of the Farmington, or farther afield, looking for trout.
Which is dumb, because this time of year the Housatonic is an excellent smallmouth bass fishery.
That’s where the snobbery comes in. I have always considered the smallmouth bass to be, at best, a member of the crab family.

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In search of the non-Wonka water

It’s been raining a lot lately, in case you hadn’t noticed.
I was taking a photo of the roaring Housatonic River from the Amesville Bridge last week, when it was close to 7,000 cubic feet per second. (For context, the river is wadeable at about 1,000 cfs and below, depending on your leg strength and general air of derring-do.)
As I fiddled with the camera and attempted to wipe rain off the lens with a greasy handkerchief, this guy just appeared from the Amesville side.
“Looks like Willy Wonka’s chocolate river!” he hollered.
Then he vanished.

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In search of the non-Wonka water

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

It’s been raining a lot lately, in case you hadn’t noticed.
I was taking a photo of the roaring Housatonic River from the Amesville Bridge last week, when it was close to 7,000 cubic feet per second. (For context, the river is wadeable at about 1,000 cfs and below, depending on your leg strength and general air of derring-do.)
As I fiddled with the camera and attempted to wipe rain off the lens with a greasy handkerchief, this guy just appeared from the Amesville side.
“Looks like Willy Wonka’s chocolate river!” he hollered.
Then he vanished.

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Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Cool, rainy weather — perfect for trout

I’ve been catching a lot of trout these last few weeks. Some wild, some semi-wild, some fresh out of the hatchery truck and swimming in circles.
The Blackberry River in East Canaan is a favorite early season place for me. The stream looks very benign from the road, but when you get in there it becomes apparent the Blackberry was designed by demonic forces.
It’s extra slippery, with jagged, pointy rocks and circular holes carved out by the water that are perfect for breaking an ankle.

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Did we mention this column won an award?

Welcome to the award-winning fishing column, “Tangled Lines.” This award-winning column by the award-winning Patrick L. Sullivan recently won a second-place award from the New England Newspaper and Press Association for a sports column in a weekly newspaper with circulation up to 6,000.
This award-winning fishing column has won the third-place award twice before. We urge readers to hang on to their waders, because clearly this column is in the middle of a dizzy ascent into the stratosphere of sports columns written for weekly newspapers with circulation up to 6,000.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Did we mention this column won an award?

Welcome to the award-winning fishing column, “Tangled Lines.” This award-winning column by the award-winning Patrick L. Sullivan recently won a second-place award from the New England Newspaper and Press Association for a sports column in a weekly newspaper with circulation up to 6,000.
This award-winning fishing column has won the third-place award twice before. We urge readers to hang on to their waders, because clearly this column is in the middle of a dizzy ascent into the stratosphere of sports columns written for weekly newspapers with circulation up to 6,000.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Warm weather brings joy, but no trout

It was 39 degrees in Lakeville, Conn., at 6 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 11, as reported by my handy-dandy L.L. Bean digital thermometer thingy.
I had some windows open, and the sensation of bare feet hitting the linoleum cut through the pre-coffee haze like a cold, sharp knife.
But the ramifications for trout fishing are terrific.
After the decent rains on Saturday, Sept. 8, I went out Sunday morning thinking the Blackberry River would be in good shape. It usually fishes well after a storm, and all that extra, cool water should wake the trout up.
Or so I thought.

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