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Tangled Lines

No phones but plenty of fish on Esopus

I was on vacation a couple weeks ago. One entire week off, in a cabin in the Catskills with no Internet connection, no cell service and a landline that only works when it’s above 65 degrees outside. Nobody knows why this is. Certainly not Verizon, the alleged phone company in charge of these things.

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No phones but plenty of fish on Esopus

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I was on vacation a couple weeks ago. One entire week off, in a cabin in the Catskills with no Internet connection, no cell service and a landline that only works when it’s above 65 degrees outside. Nobody knows why this is. Certainly not Verizon, the alleged phone company in charge of these things.

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If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Hot air balloons and the white fly hatch

I have a grab bag of fishing thoughts today. This is a tactic frequently employed by award-winning fishing columnists to disguise the fact that there really isn’t much to write about.
Item: The other night, in the middle of the famous Housatonic River white fly hatch, I managed to avoid catching a single fish.
The white flies were all over the place, including my personal ear- and nasal-type areas. I had a White Wulff dry fly, coated not only with silicone gel but some highly recommended powder stuff called “Frog’s Fanny.”

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Hot air balloons and the white fly hatch

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I have a grab-bag of fishing thoughts today. This is a tactic frequently employed by award-winning fishing columnists to disguise the fact that there really isn’t much to write about.
Item: The other night, in the middle of the famous Housatonic River white fly hatch, I managed to avoid catching a single fish.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Smallmouth, dead drift, white flies

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I am a trout snob. I admit it freely.
And when the weather gets warm, water temperatures in the Housatonic rise, and the trout go on vacation, I generally head to the consistently cold waters of the Farmington, or farther afield, looking for trout.
Which is dumb, because this time of year the Housatonic is an excellent smallmouth bass fishery.
That’s where the snobbery comes in. I have always considered the smallmouth bass to be, at best, a member of the crab family.

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In search of the non-Wonka water

It’s been raining a lot lately, in case you hadn’t noticed.
I was taking a photo of the roaring Housatonic River from the Amesville Bridge last week, when it was close to 7,000 cubic feet per second. (For context, the river is wadeable at about 1,000 cfs and below, depending on your leg strength and general air of derring-do.)
As I fiddled with the camera and attempted to wipe rain off the lens with a greasy handkerchief, this guy just appeared from the Amesville side.
“Looks like Willy Wonka’s chocolate river!” he hollered.
Then he vanished.

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In search of the non-Wonka water

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

It’s been raining a lot lately, in case you hadn’t noticed.
I was taking a photo of the roaring Housatonic River from the Amesville Bridge last week, when it was close to 7,000 cubic feet per second. (For context, the river is wadeable at about 1,000 cfs and below, depending on your leg strength and general air of derring-do.)
As I fiddled with the camera and attempted to wipe rain off the lens with a greasy handkerchief, this guy just appeared from the Amesville side.
“Looks like Willy Wonka’s chocolate river!” he hollered.
Then he vanished.

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Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Cool, rainy weather — perfect for trout

I’ve been catching a lot of trout these last few weeks. Some wild, some semi-wild, some fresh out of the hatchery truck and swimming in circles.
The Blackberry River in East Canaan is a favorite early season place for me. The stream looks very benign from the road, but when you get in there it becomes apparent the Blackberry was designed by demonic forces.
It’s extra slippery, with jagged, pointy rocks and circular holes carved out by the water that are perfect for breaking an ankle.

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Did we mention this column won an award?

Welcome to the award-winning fishing column, “Tangled Lines.” This award-winning column by the award-winning Patrick L. Sullivan recently won a second-place award from the New England Newspaper and Press Association for a sports column in a weekly newspaper with circulation up to 6,000.
This award-winning fishing column has won the third-place award twice before. We urge readers to hang on to their waders, because clearly this column is in the middle of a dizzy ascent into the stratosphere of sports columns written for weekly newspapers with circulation up to 6,000.

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Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Did we mention this column won an award?

Welcome to the award-winning fishing column, “Tangled Lines.” This award-winning column by the award-winning Patrick L. Sullivan recently won a second-place award from the New England Newspaper and Press Association for a sports column in a weekly newspaper with circulation up to 6,000.
This award-winning fishing column has won the third-place award twice before. We urge readers to hang on to their waders, because clearly this column is in the middle of a dizzy ascent into the stratosphere of sports columns written for weekly newspapers with circulation up to 6,000.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.