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Tangled Lines

No pizza, just trout

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

Some thoughts on the trout season, now that the madness is in full swing:
• On Friday, May 7, Joe Cieslowski of North Canaan showed off his home stream to fellow members of the Northwestern Connecticut chapter of Trout Unlimited (TU). He lured me to Beckley Furnace with a promise of pizza, and since I was en route to Housatonic Valley Regional High School for the Mr. Housatonic contest anyway, free food and discussion sounded like a good idea.

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Fishing, meatloaf and the New Math

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I feel like Daniel Murphy of the New York Mets.
The Mets are off to their best start since, er, forever — 15 and 5 as of Tuesday, April 28.
Murphy is off to a slow start at the plate, and he sometimes does bizarre and unhelpful things.
Then he makes up for it by hitting three-run homers.

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There will be no solitude on Opening Day

Saturday, April 11, is Opening Day of trout season in Connecticut.
This is misleading, because there are many places to fish before Opening Day. Many of them are nearby: The Farmington River’s year-round catch and release area; the Housatonic River’s year-round catch and release area; the lower part of Macedonia Brook, ditto; Wachocastinook Brook, ditto.
Not to mention the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, where there is no closed season — just conditions that make fishing untenable.

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No solitude on Opening Day

Saturday, April 11, is Opening Day of trout season in Connecticut.
This is misleading, because there are many places to fish before Opening Day. Many of them are nearby: The Farmington River’s year-round catch and release area; the Housatonic River’s year-round catch and release area; the lower part of Macedonia Brook, ditto; Wachocastinook Brook, ditto.

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Fishing in icy waters: ‘Every step an adventure!’

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

By the time this is published, trout season will be open in New York. General regulations fishing begins April 11 in Connecticut, and there is no closed season in Massachusetts.
However, fishing in year-round waters in New England comes with its own built-in restrictions: snow and ice.

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Getting out on the river is a relief

On Wednesday, March 11, I took a much-needed break from bomb threats, budgets and the lingering horror of “50 Shades of Grey” and went fishing on the West Branch of the Farmington River.
The permanent catch-and-release area has a year-round season. Fishing in winter, however, is a very hit-or-miss proposition — emphasis on miss.
Stumbling around on snowy, icy river banks and trying to tie on flies with numb fingers is, generally speaking, not a lot of fun.

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Those who can’t fish, shop for gear

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I should have gone fishing on Saturday, Jan. 24.
If you recall, it was snowing a bit, but it wasn’t very cold out, and the air had that sort of flat feeling that usually works out well for this angler.
So a quick jaunt to the West Branch of the Farmington would have been completely feasible.

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I decided to use a 6X fluorocarbon tippet

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

PHOENICIA, N.Y. — The stuffed-animal shrine along the Esopus Creek about a half mile outside of town has been modified, I discovered a few weeks ago.
The last time I saw the shrine there were four of the toys arranged horizontally along some streamside debris.
Now two of them have been rigged up on streamside saplings.
It’s bizarre, however it’s sliced.

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The camera is never there for the big ones

On Sept. 29, around 11:30 a.m.,  I hauled a female brown trout out of the stretch of the Esopus Creek below Phoenicia, N.Y.
And what a trout it was.  It was like catching a leg of lamb. 
She was lurking in a riffle at the top of where the channel moves over to the road side and gains momentum before forming a very deep pool.  

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From specks to hairy mayflies, it’s a mad fishing world

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I hit the Housatonic late afternoon on Monday, Sept. 15, at a stretch called “Push ’Em Up,” which has a long, slow, big pool and, usually, three or four guys doing the usual “I will stand here with my strike indicator and Prince nymph until I catch the big one” routine.
Honestly, some of the anglers I observe could get jobs in physics laboratories as Immovable Objects.

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