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Tangled Lines

Those who can’t fish, shop for gear

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I should have gone fishing on Saturday, Jan. 24.
If you recall, it was snowing a bit, but it wasn’t very cold out, and the air had that sort of flat feeling that usually works out well for this angler.
So a quick jaunt to the West Branch of the Farmington would have been completely feasible.

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I decided to use a 6X fluorocarbon tippet

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

PHOENICIA, N.Y. — The stuffed-animal shrine along the Esopus Creek about a half mile outside of town has been modified, I discovered a few weeks ago.
The last time I saw the shrine there were four of the toys arranged horizontally along some streamside debris.
Now two of them have been rigged up on streamside saplings.
It’s bizarre, however it’s sliced.

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The camera is never there for the big ones

On Sept. 29, around 11:30 a.m.,  I hauled a female brown trout out of the stretch of the Esopus Creek below Phoenicia, N.Y.
And what a trout it was.  It was like catching a leg of lamb. 
She was lurking in a riffle at the top of where the channel moves over to the road side and gains momentum before forming a very deep pool.  

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From specks to hairy mayflies, it’s a mad fishing world

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I hit the Housatonic late afternoon on Monday, Sept. 15, at a stretch called “Push ’Em Up,” which has a long, slow, big pool and, usually, three or four guys doing the usual “I will stand here with my strike indicator and Prince nymph until I catch the big one” routine.
Honestly, some of the anglers I observe could get jobs in physics laboratories as Immovable Objects.

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When fishing isn’t dreamy and relaxing

Today we’ll talk about how to go quietly crazy while trying to catch native brook trout.
Step One: Forget to bring a spool of 4X tippet.
Step Two: Have somebody steal your shoelaces.
Step Three: Drop your camera on some rocks and watch it bounce into a puddle.
The stream in question is Wachocastinook, aka Riga Brook. It comes out of South Pond on Mount Riga and travels 3 miles and change through a steep gorge, with many deep holes and a nice waterfall along the way.

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Old dog, new tricks on the trout stream

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I have been reading up on Euro-nymphing.
I realize this phrase lends itself to misinterpretation. The reader may well be wondering if a little box is going to pop up, asking if he or she is over 18.
Fear not. Euro-nymphing refers to a style of fly-fishing that involves long rods, longer leaders and three or more nymphs, a type of fly that is fished under water and represents bug larva.
And if that still gets you hot and bothered, that’s your problem.

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Forget seed catalog, time to take out tackle

It’s March 11. The sun is shining, and at noon it’s about 50 degrees outside.
There are spring training baseball games on the radio. (The Mets are now on WOR, 710-AM.)
The Mount Everest of plowed snow in my yard has shrunk to the size of a minor Matterhorn. The chipmunks are back. I expect a sighting of the albino skunk who lives under my living room any minute.
What does this mean?
It means it’s time to dig out the fishing tackle and have a look.

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Reminiscing about flies gone by

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

The best trout I caught in 2013 was on the Neversink River in Claryville, N.Y. People I know actually own the pool where the east and west branches of this legendary river come together. The 20-something-inch brown that finally took my plain Jane ordinary mid-gray wet fly was hanging around just downstream in a series of deep holes created by rip rap installed by the homeowner to keep the house from washing away.
This might sound like bragging. Well, it is. The Neversink is heavily posted until you get to public water below the reservoir, and it’s a shame.

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Reminiscing about flies gone by

The best trout I caught in 2013 was on the Neversink River in Claryville, N.Y. People I know actually own the pool where the east and west branches of this legendary river come together. The 20-something-inch brown that finally took my plain Jane ordinary mid-gray wet fly was hanging around just downstream in a series of deep holes created by rip rap installed by the home­owner to keep the house from washing away.
This might sound like bragging. Well, it is. The Neversink is heavily posted until you get to public water below the reservoir, and it’s a shame.

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Ice adds spice to fishing

It snowed last week.
Not very much, but enough to send the weather people on television into their traditional snow panic mode.
One of them always seems to be on the verge of tears no matter what the season, but the onset of winter really brings on the incipient waterworks.
“There’s a cold front (gasp) moving east from Canada (stifled sob) and when it collides with this warm (gulp) air mass now in the Washington, D.C. area, it could bring (stifled sob) UP TO ONE INCH of snow to Connecticut (breaks down completely).”

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