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Four Local Musicians Record a Debut Album

The Music Scene: The Nice Ones

The Nice Ones are the definition of hometown heroes.
Let’s look at all the criteria.
All four of the band members call northwestern Connecticut their home? Check. They all graduated from Housatonic Valley Regional High School? Check. They’ve created a name for themselves by playing a ton of shows? Check. They raised $5,805 via Kickstarter to fund their full-length debut album? Check.
That last bit of information is incredibly impressive, especially when you consider that they set their goal at $5,000.

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Great Artists, Great Friends, Great Music

The Music Scene

“We met when we were 12 years old growing up in Los Angeles,” says pianist Lincoln Mayorga of his friendship of six decades with violinist Arnold Steinhardt.
“We performed in talent shows together,” the start of a lifelong association. “It was an exhilarating environment in Los Angeles in 1949. We rode streetcars that covered the entire city. And it was easy to find a good music teacher in those days.”

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Raising the Spirit

The Music Scene

Gospelfest returns this weekend to The Hotchkiss School for its 13th annual musical outpouring, bringing together the gospel choirs of six area schools this year (Hotchkiss, Salisbury School, South Kent, Taft, Miss Porter’s, and Westover).
The man behind it all (and who directs all the choirs) is the indomitable Michael Whitney Brown, the Northwest Corner’s cheerleader for the spirit. The Bridgeport native was born into a musical, Pentecostal family and could play music almost as soon as he could breathe.

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Music for Gamers And Everyone Else

The Music Scene

Whether you’re an avid gamer or have never picked up a controller, Tommy Tallarico wants you to have a great time at Video Games Live.

This immersive concert features music from popular video games and franchises (such as Mario, Zelda, Halo and Warcraft) performed by orchestras and choirs, along with synchronized video footage and interactive segments to give it “the excitement and energy of a rock concert.” It’s coming to the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts in Hartford on Saturday, April 13, at 7:30 p.m.

A World of Music, Right Here

The Music Scene

The story of the founding of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, initially called the Palestine Symphony Orchestra, is one that I did not know. It is certainly more than worth the telling.
“Orchestra of Exiles,” a feature-length documentary airing on PBS stations next weekend, beautifully portrays the tale in words, images and stirring music, focusing on the heroic efforts of its founder, Bronislaw Huberman.

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Another Young Talent Enters

The Music Scene

Reading about Van Cliburn’s Russian triumph at the Tchaikovsky Piano Competition in 1958, on the occasion of his death last week, I was struck by how quaint and even ridiculous the Cold War scenario makes the story. As if producing a 23-year-old piano prodigy — straight from the Texas heartland, no less! — could somehow burnish America’s reputation, conquer a nation and repair the spirits of another nation psychologically diminished by a piece of orbiting metal (aka Sputnik), as one obituary suggested.

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How To Destroy Angels Debuts Studio Album

Did you see “The Social Network” or “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo”? If you liked the award-winning scores for these two films, there’s a good chance you’ll like the debut studio album by How To Destroy Angels, “Welcome Oblivion,” which comes out March 5 through Columbia Records.

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An Uneasy Spot For Mister Inbetween

Brahms vs. Beethoven, but what about Bruckner?

In the German-speaking countries of the 1890s, music lovers were tied either to Brahms or Wagner: The conservative romantic classicist or the visionary explorer of new musical frontiers.
Those descriptions were and are gross oversimplifications, but such was the passionate squabbling indulged in at the time, especially by music critics, that many listeners felt obligated to take sides.

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Mr. Bach, pull out those stops!

The Music Scene

By the time he was 40 years old, Johann Sebastian Bach had been married twice and sired 10 children. We can thank our lucky stars that a presumably chaotic home life did not drain his creative, er, juices. (Though perhaps all those little “Bachlets” wore powdered wigs and practiced the clavichord for 10 hours a day.)

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Towne Crier Hosts Lúnasa (Before Leaving Pawling)

The Music Scene

It’s settled. After a year of waiting, fans have learned that The Towne Crier, which lost its lease in Pawling, NY, has found a new home in Beacon. But the club’s founder, Phil Ciganer, says the music will continue without interruption while construction of the new Towne Crier in Beacon is underway.
That means that Lúnasa, “the hottest Irish acoustic band on the planet” so named by The New York Times, will kick off its month-long U.S. tour with a performance at the Towne Crier as planned, in Pawling, on Friday, Feb. 22.

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