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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

April fool's

Editorial Cartoon

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Grating

Editorial Cartoon

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Domino Theory comes of age

A View From the Edge

Those of us old enough to remember the excuse, oops sorry, theory of why we were fighting in Vietnam — Eisenhower’s, Nixon’s and Cap Weinberger’s pet phrase, the Domino Theory — also remember that the reasoning was flawed, that if Vietnam fell to the Communists, then the rest of Southeast Asia would fall as well.
The problem there was that, except for Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, the largest portion (land and population) of Southeast Asia was already Communist: China, North Korea and the USSR (remembering that the USSR stretches all the way to the Pacific).

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A friend, indeed

The Country Curmudgeon

There are few perfect friends. In fact, some friends are aggravating. It may seem like a mystery as to why we stay friends with some of them.
This is where the old joke applies about the family that has an uncle who thinks he is a chicken living with them. He is very annoying with his clucking and scratching out in the yard. When the family is asked why they do not get him some treatment they reply, “Because we need the eggs.” And so it is with our annoying friends.

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Nature’s mimics

Nature's Notebook
sheth@audubon.org

I received an email recently from a reader of this column who encountered a bird that sounded like a woodpecker. A closer look revealed that it was actually a crow.
Crows are part of a family of birds that are considered mimics and includes jays, ravens, magpies and others. Crows are fascinating to watch and very smart. This group is considered the most intelligent among birds.
The old adage about the “wise old owl” being “wise” is actually not true. Because their eyes take up so much room in their heads, owls have relatively small brains.

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It’s a good time to set some real goals for statewide volunteerism

Guest Commentary

Former state Rep. Deborah Heinrich is the new nonprofit liaison to the governor, a position created this year to advocate for nonprofit agencies. Gov. Dannel Malloy, in creating the new position, noted that he would look for sacrifice from everyone but would not cut the safety net of services provided by the nonprofit community.
On Monday, March 14, the CPO Council of the Connecticut United Way went to Hartford to meet with Ms. Heinrich to talk about how she sees her new role and how the United Way can help be a part of the solution.

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Scrambling for a piece of the budget pie

If You Ask Me

Giving public employees the right to bargain collectively isn’t a very old idea or a very good one, but it’s not something you take back, certainly not in Connecticut.
In fact, Connecticut Democrats and a few Republicans in the Legislature are making some ill-timed noise about expanding public employee bargaining.

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Why has cancer been so difficult to cure?

The Body Scientific

In 1954, there was a horrendous polio epidemic. By 1958, almost no one got polio. The 1960s saw the end of measles, mumps and rubella. After 1945, antibiotics tamed previously frightening infections. The public got used to these victories and waited for cancer to be next.

But cancer remained “The Emperor of All Maladies” — the title of a recent book by oncologist Siddartha Mukerjee. Despite a War on Cancer announced by President Nixon and the investment of vast resources, cancer remains. How is this possible?

Turning Back The Pages 3-31

Turning Back The Pages

75 years ago —March 1936
Starting in May, subscribers of the Southern New England Telephone Company who have handset telephones currently in service and who have paid the 15-cent monthly handset charge continuously for 36 months or more will no longer find this charge appearing on their telephone bills.
SALISBURY — Mr. and Mrs. G. Calvin Senior motored to Hartford on Sunday with Miss May Senior, who is employed at the Hartford Fire Insurance Company.
Many local motorists were out last Sunday to view the damage caused by the flood waters in New Hartford and Hartford.

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Watch the budgets, and Region One students

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

As municipal and education budgets come together, this is the time for citizens of the Northwest Corner to be acutely aware of where the painful cuts are happening (or not happening where they should) in each budget that affects their lives and be sure their voices are heard when the final votes occur.
This newspaper will keep track of meeting times for our readers; just be sure to take advantage of the knowledge and make an appearance when final votes on budgets are happening.

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