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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Plans to keep the lights on in Connecticut

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Who would have thought that an October snowstorm could throw the generally civilized state of Connecticut back into the 19th century? Many locations were without power for more than a week due to the ravages of Winter Storm Alfred, with some areas of the state in the dark for 13 days. It would seem inarguable that the state and Connecticut Light & Power, which covered the areas most affected by this storm, were not prepared for weather disasters, especially since that outage came on the heels of widespread loss of power in the wake of Tropical Storm Irene in August.

Carl Williams was an original

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Few people make a real, lasting difference and affect many aspects of the identity of the community in which they live. Salisbury’s Carl Williams, who died this past week, was such a person. His dedication to serving his town (and while teaching and coaching at Salisbury School, his students) was boundless, and his charm and humor while doing so was endlessly appreciated by his admirers, which included many over the years at The Lakeville Journal.

Turning Back the Pages - January 19

100 years ago — January 1912

Letters to the Editor - January 19

Letters to the Editor - The Lakeville Journal

Sharon’s ‘sorry’  is not a negation of its censorship
 

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What a difference a year makes

Nature's Notebook

What a difference a year makes. Last year at this time we were knee-deep in snow. This year, until perhaps recently, we were on target for one of the warmest winters on record.
Though unusual, the warm weather did make it easier to get outside and enjoy nature. Because of the lack of snow, animals are still very active. A recent walk at the Audubon Center on a warm day last week revealed some interesting things. Up at Bog Meadow Pond I watched as a beaver carried on as if it were summer, casually swimming across the pond to its lodge carrying a freshly cut birch twig.

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Retiring later

Editorial Cartoon

Time for a global financial transaction tax

Insight

It is gratifying to note the growing support for the idea of a financial transaction tax (like a sales tax) levied on trades of stocks, bonds, derivatives and other financial instruments, with the revenues applied to lessen or eliminate the national debt in the United States and in other debt-ridden countries.

Support comes not only from the 99 percent Occupy Wall Street movement, but also from such likely and unlikely voices as Nicolas Sarkozy, Angela Merkel, Al Gore, George Soros, Bill Gates, Ralph Nader, Pope Benedict XVI and the Archbishop of Canterbury.

When to start saving for retirement? Now

Independent Investor

What are the best avenues to save for retirement?

Today savers are offered a plethora of tax-deferred retirement plans. For those of you who are just starting out the choices can seem overwhelming but it is not as hard as you think.

Back in the day, before the advent of government-sponsored savings plans, defined benefit pension plans and the odd annuity were the only investment vehicles available to me.

Good news for the US jobless rate

A View From The Edge

By the time you read this, some anti-administration spin doctor will have concluded that the improving U.S. unemployment rate of 8.5 percent is all smoke and mirrors.

They will claim that there are people who dropped out of the job market for reasons that range from re-education (true), to retirement (true), to sheer boredom at not finding a job after a year or more (true).

Republican establishment is sadly absent

If You Ask Me

You can almost hear Connecticut’s Republicans chanting, “We’re number 35, we’re number 35,” as they march to the polls on April 24, only to find the always exciting Mitt Romney has already won.

Yes, April 24. Connecticut Republicans will not be selecting their candidate for president until 32 other states, the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands have had their turn.