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The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Imprisoned?

Editorial Cartoon

Politics and the law of defamation

Insight

Anecdotal studies of campaign financing and advertising practices across America suggest the reality of what we have long suspected: In many campaigns, more money is spent, not on promoting the qualities and positions of particular candidates, but rather on attacking and defaming their opponents. Hate and fear are great motivators at the polls, and 2012 promises to be a record year — in dollar volume and in defamation.

Life in Falls Village, generations ago

The Minister's Patch

Longtime Falls Village resident Rev. Cyril Wismar (1918-2012) shared with The Lakeville Journal his remembrances, written in May, 2011, of a Falls Village/Town of Canaan of a different time. His wife of 68 years, Sylvia, was glad to allow us to share them now with our readers. The first part can be found in last week’s Lakeville Journal or at www.tricornernews.com.

Part 2 of 2

A different way of defining conventions

If You Ask Me

There hasn’t been a brokered convention — the kind unhappy Republicans, independents and media elites are dreaming about this year — since the Republicans had their last one in 1948 and the Democrats in 1952.

The candidates nominated then, Tom Dewey and Adlai Stevenson, lost the presidency — twice, as it turned out. A brokered convention hasn’t produced a winner since Franklin Roosevelt 80 years ago.

A long time coming, but worth the wait

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

It’s been more than a decade since the Canaan Union Station burned, destroying a large part of not only the historic railroad station but also a very meaningful part of the heart and soul of North Canaan. Whatever else those who saw it aflame in 2001thought and felt , seeing an icon so sadly diminished, they would surely have been surprised to know that it would take so long for the station to be fully restored and again fulfilling its position at the town’s center.

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Turning Back the Pages - March 1

100 years ago — 1912

SHARON — Richard Roselle has purchased of Charles Mallory the house just south of the Mallory residence in Sharon Valley.

LAKEVILLE — Mr. and Mrs. C.F. Hawley are operating a new touring car.

Chicken pox exists in nearly every house in Lime Rock. There is one case of measles in Hoppertown.

About every germ in the catalog has visited Lakeville this winter except the sidewalk germ. The reliable preventative for this germ is just common plain unsifted ashes.

A Harry Lauder tree whacks me in the noggin

Ranting Retiree

My dear mother was a fountain of good advice to her brood of four boys. She bubbled over with words of wisdom that still resonate in me.

One of the best was: “A lesser word is a better word.” That is a rough translation of the original Yiddish, though my mother grew up in Chicopee, Mass., speaking English and learned the language of the old country from family who came to the USA through Ellis Island.

What did my mother’s rough statement really mean? I’ll tell you: “Silence is golden.” Or, if you don’t know what you are talking about, as Jay Leno would put it, “Shaddup.”

Letters to the Editor - March 1

Letters to the Editor - The Lakeville Journal

This was not democratic discussion
Enclosed are some remarks concerning the Region One School District Board of Education (BOE) meeting of February.
The first part of the meeting consisted of an unscheduled species of inquisition targeting Canaan (Falls Village) Region One BOE Representative Gale Toensing.

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Maple sugaring: a process born from tradition

Nature's Notebook

The sugaring season here in northwest Connecticut is now in full swing. Driving along our country roads you can see the signs: buckets of all kinds attached to maple trees (and sometimes non-maple trees!), plastic tubing along hillsides making its way from tree to tree to the ultimate collection point and steam billowing from local sugar houses.

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Some reproductive Connecticut history

If You Ask Me
dahles@hotmail.com

If, as legend has it, Lincoln called Harriet Beecher Stowe “the little lady who started the big war” with “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” I guess New Haven’s Estelle Griswold could qualify as the lady who started the big culture war.

Griswold, who died in 1981, gave her name to Griswold v Connecticut, the 1965 Supreme Court decision that overturned an 1879 Connecticut law prohibiting the use of “any drug, medicinal article or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception.”