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Simple steps to avoid a stroke

SALISBURY — Melissa Guisti Braislin, stroke progam coordinator at Sharon Hospital, took a group through the basics of strokes on Saturday morning, April 28, at Noble Horizons.
Braislin said that strokes are 80 percent preventable. That was the good news.
The bad news was that strokes are the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S.
With ischemic strokes, a blood vessel to the brain is blocked. This is more common than the hemorrhagic stroke, in which a blood vessel in the brain bursts. Hemorrhagic strokes are more deadly.

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Love and help from service dogs

SALISBURY — Everyone had to restrain the natural instinct to pet the dogs at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday morning, May 5.
Barbara Hayward and Jeanne Jones from Educated Canines Assisting with Disabilities (ECAD), a nonprofit group in Winchester, brought Honor, a golden retriever puppy (5 months old) and the more experienced black Lab Holly (6 years) to demonstrate how dogs are trained to assist people with disabilities.
It’s a lengthy process. 

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The pros and cons of getting the rabies shot

Some people are still afraid that vaccines are causing autism in their children, even though science seems to have pretty conclusively proved that this is not the case; but we parents do love our offspring and want to do all we can to protect them.
Which of course is why you should vaccinate them: to protect them from the many diseases that killed and crippled previous generations of children. 
Now there is a movement against getting distemper or rabies vaccines for dogs and cats. There is a fear that the shots will (again) cause autism. 

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Salad days and dandelions

Dandelions must have incredible life force; how else could they thrive and survive when pretty much everyone in America is trying to kill them?
It seems that there is an effort now to stop trying to eradicate these wild green-and-yellow beasts (see the article in this week’s Compass Arts and Entertainment). They’re good for the bees, and we of course want to do all we can to help our pollinators thrive. 

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The skinny on coconut fat

I’ve cooked for some people with pretty serious food restrictions, either by choice or because of allergies or intolerance.
It’s possible that I am now faced with my greatest challenge. I won’t lay out the full extent of it but I’ll say the list of forbidden foods is umm quite large. He’s a lovely person, however, and therefore worth the effort.

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Health Quest makes plans to expand into Connecticut

Tri-state area residents now have additional hospitals and care providers to choose from as Health Quest continues to grow. 
The New York-based nonprofit purchased Sharon Hospital in 2017, adding the Connecticut facility to its existing group. Other Health Quest hospitals include Vassar Brothers Medical Center in Poughkeepsie, Northern Dutchess Hospital in Rhinebeck and Putnam Hospital Center in Carmel, N.Y. 

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An expert offers help on avoiding ticks

SALISBURY — Dr. Kirby Stafford, the state entomologist, knows a lot about ticks. He even wears a tick lapel pin on his sports jacket.
Stafford was at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday, March 24, to talk about Lyme disease and tick control.
It happened to be a sunny day with the temperature nudging into the 50s.
Someone asked, “Would we get ticks if we went for a walk in the woods today?”
“Oh yeah,” replied Stafford.

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Find work in health care

FALLS VILLAGE — The gym at Housatonic Valley Regional High School was full on Friday afternoon, April 6, with 29 health-related organizations discussing their operations and services with a crowd of students and curious adults.
Mary O’Neill had a strategic spot to the left of the entrance. O’Neill, who runs the School to Career program at the high school, had about 50 packets of information on careers in specific areas of health care: fitness trainer, pharmacist and chiropractor, for example.

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Digging deep to get to the roots of distress

LAKEVILLE — If you are feeling run down, Lakeville’s Tracie Shannon offers “Intuitive Guidance, Healing Bodywork and Energy Management.”
Shannon said she works with the mental, physical, emotional and spiritual body. “Each one affects the others.”
She talks with the client to determine which of the bodies needs attention. Often a physical ailment is connected to “some kind of discord or block” in the  peron’s mental or emotional state.

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Taking the smell out of cabbage

When we were young and looking for our first apartment, my husband would eliminate certain rental options by wrinkling his nose and saying, “Impossible. It smells like cabbage.”
Not raw cabbage, of course, but the boiled stuff.
What makes cabbage give off such a strong odor when it’s cooking? According to one website, it’s because the amount of sulfur in the leaves increases as you cook them; the longer you cook your cabbage, the stronger the scent will be.

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