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The Winsted Journal Editorial

Residents see through a partisan charade

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Budget opponents demonstrated that they have little respect for their neighbors Monday night as they attempted to derail a town budget meeting over procedural minutiae.
Once again it was the two Republicans, Kenneth Fracasso and Glenn Albanesius, who attempted to postpone Monday’s meeting due to an error in the recorded minutes from a previous selectmen’s meeting. The selectmen also contended in a last-minute move that the meeting could not be held because printed copies of the budget had not been available prior to Monday night’s budget meeting.

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Enough is enough — it’s time to pass the budget

Majority Democrats on the Winchester Board of Selectmen did the right thing Monday night, making it their duty to bring the town’s proposed 2012-13 budget down to a zero increase, and then send it to voters for ratification. In a short but contentious meeting, the majority simultaneously reduced the budget to a zero increase, initiated funding for the Holabird Avenue bridge project and added revenue to the town’s fund balance.

Winsted is crying out for strong leadership

The Winsted Journal Editorial

A common theme that has been coming up lately in town is the concept of leadership and whether there is any of it left on the town’s top governmental board. While neighbors can argue incessantly over which political party is causing the town’s problems, one thing is clear: the Winchester Board of Selectmen has been acting dysfunctionally for much of this year, and members of both political parties are to blame.

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Residents voting against themselves, community

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Members of the Winsted-Winchester community who aren’t sick of watching themselves return to the polls to defeat the town budget ought to look around and notice all the people who are disgusted with the process. Yes, the budget cutters have “won” again by putting up ill-willed signs and sending misleading postcards to town residents, but it’s the overall community that’s suffering at the hands of a few misguided souls.

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Hope for a smooth transition at schools

With children and parents celebrating the first day of school this week, some major changes were immediately obvious at the town’s three public schools, which are sharing two principals.

Mayor’s school report falls on deaf ears

As predicted by this newspaper in an editorial early last month, Mayor Maryann Welcome’s decision to commission a study of of the town’s school system fell largely on deaf ears Monday night, as the conclusions were exactly what critics anticipated — a validation of the mayor’s belief that closing a school will be bad for the town.

Race for 63rd good for Winsted

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Winsted has a good reason to be the center of widespread attention this fall, as this week’s primary vote has resulted in a local race for state office.
With Selectman Michael Renzullo’s win in the Democratic primary for the 63rd District seat in the House of Representatives, he will face former selectman Jay Case, the Republican nominee, in a matchup that should be exciting and thought-provoking. Congratulations go out to both candidates for making it this far.

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Useless bickering doesn’t help Winsted school system

Republican members of the Winchester Board of Selectmen have become basically useless when it comes to developing a consensus on the town’s 2012-13 budget, and are actually making life more miserable for everyone in town by working to complicate and protract the budget process.

A smart PR effort for the local GOP

The Winsted Journal Editorial

After working to defeat two budgets in town this year by lobbying hard against any and all tax increases, Winchester’s local Republican party is continuing to win the public relations battle this week by organizing to help renovate the Rowley Street Playground, which is sorely in need of repairs.

A 1-mill increase is fair this year

The Winsted Journal Editorial

The Winchester Board of Selectmen’s decision to offer a fair, 1-mill budget increase for 2012-13, in response to the electorate’s defeat of a more expensive proposal earlier this month, comes as a relief to supporters of services and infrastructure in town.

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