Login

The Winsted Journal Editorial

State gives towns reasons to worry

 

Connecticut residents who are wondering how Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s next biennial budget is going to affect them may have good reason to worry, as the proposal is leaving local town leaders with unanswered questions.

State gives towns reasons to worry

Connecticut residents who are wondering how Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s next biennial budget is going to affect them may have good reason to worry, as the proposal is leaving local town leaders with unanswered questions.

Getting a dose of fiscal medicine

Winchester residents are finally getting a dose of needed medicine with the hiring of a nonpartisan outsider to serve as interim finance director here. Jane Wall, the accountant who is combing through financial records at Town Hall in the wake of allegations of missing funds and the firing of former director Henry Centrella, has concluded that Winsted is so cash-strapped that a two-mill increase in the tax rate is necessary to get the town back on its feet.

Why does this idea sound so familiar?

Bad fiscal news may help in the long run

 

Based on the latest projections offered by Interim Finance Director Jane Wall, it is safe to say Winsted’s current financial situation is far from ideal, but the good news appears to be that town officials are looking closely at the situation and doing everything they can to remedy problems before they get out of control.

Winsted needs renewed leadership

Just a month into 2013, members of the Winchester Board of Selectmen are facing some of the town’s most crucial fiscal problems in years, and townspeople are growing increasingly frustrated with the notion that the school system has come close to seeing its electricity shut off or that the town’s Water and Sewer Commission may be nearly $2 million short on cash.

GOP selectmen don’t back up their claims

Members of the Republican minority on the Winchester Board of Selectmen have made it no secret in recent months that they want to oust Town Manager Dale Martin from his position at Town Hall, but what’s been missing from the conversation has been a legitimate reason.

Winchester voters make positive move

Despite some negativity expressed by a small group of malcontents, Winchester voters overwhelmingly agreed last week that the town should continue to fund its share of the public Main Street Enhancement Project. Phase two of the project got its final approval from voters at a Jan. 10 referendum at Town Hall.

Residents thankfully vote ‘Yes’

The Winsted Journal Editorial

Winchester residents rightly voted “Yes” Thursday, Jan. 10, to approve the second phase of the public Main Street Enhancement Project, despite resistance from some members of the community who spoke Monday night at Town Hall. An overwhelmingly positive vote on the measure should be seen as a sign that Winsted can do positive things when community members put their mind to them.

Preposterous ‘fiscal cliff’ discussion finally over

Regular readers of this newspaper may have noticed in recent months that we’ve spent decidedly little time discussing the so-called “fiscal cliff” and related banter surrounding an alleged deadline that pundits repeatedly said was destined to plunge the nation into an economic death spiral.

If we did broach the subject of this absurd apocalyptic tale, it was generally to mock the proponents of such preposterous terminology, which suggested a doomsday scenario on par with alleged end-of-the world Mayan prophecies, debunked when the world didn’t end on Dec. 21, 2012.

Tragedy compels us to examine ourselves

With less than a week having passed since the incomprehensible massacre that occurred Dec. 14 at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, there isn’t much more to say at this writing that hasn’t already been said in countless conversations, in print, on television and radio programs. For those of us who are not directly connected to the Newtown community, there may be a sense of numbness and a desire to avoid the news altogether as the funerals continue and affected families begin their long and painful recovery.