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The Long View

The Newtown massacre: a communal tragedy

As with everyone else, I am horrified by the recent massacre of 20 children and eight adults in Newtown. No words can really ameliorate, and perhaps none can adequately explain such a communal tragedy, but the publisher has asked me to offer a few thoughts. I do so based on two different sets of special knowledge that I have accumulated. One comes from my years of working with the Amish, and the other, from collaborating on three books with the world’s leading expert on serial killers, Robert K. Ressler.

Newtown massacre: a communal tragedy

As with everyone else, I am horrified by the recent massacre of 20 children and eight adults in Newtown, Conn. No words can really ameliorate, and perhaps none can adequately explain such a communal tragedy, but the publisher has asked me to offer a few thoughts. I do so based on two different sets of special knowledge that I have accumulated. One comes from my years of working with the Amish, and the other, from collaborating on three books with the world’s leading expert on serial killers, Robert K. Ressler.

The Newtown massacre: a communal tragedy

The Long View

As with everyone else, I am horrified by the recent massacre of 20 children and eight adults in Newtown. No words can really ameliorate, and perhaps none can adequately explain such a communal tragedy, but the publisher has asked me to offer a few thoughts. I do so based on two different sets of special knowledge that I have accumulated. One comes from my years of working with the Amish, and the other, from collaborating on three books with the world’s leading expert on serial killers, Robert K. Ressler.

The ‘lite beer’ election: money’s corruptive influence

The Long View

Part 3

The ‘lite beer’ election: money

The Long View

Part 3

The ‘lite beer’ election: Infrastructures

The Long View

Part 2

In a previous column, I asserted that our choices in the forthcoming presidential election are not only too narrow, but that the parties and candidates are refusing to deal with the really difficult problems that confront us. Among them are three sets of crumbling infrastructure: the physical infrastructure of roads, rails, bridges and public facilities; the health care system; and the higher education system.

These problems did not arise overnight.

The ‘lite beer’ election: Infrastructures

The Long View

Part 2

In a previous column, I asserted that our choices in the forthcoming presidential election are not only too narrow, but that the parties and candidates are refusing to deal with the really difficult problems that confront us. Among them are three sets of crumbling infrastructure: the physical infrastructure of roads, rails, bridges and public facilities; the health care system; and the higher education system.

These problems did not arise overnight.

The lite beer election raises questions

Part 1

At a dinner with friends of both the Republican and the Democratic persuasion, the question was raised: Do we have adequate choices in this coming presidential election? No one could answer “yes.” I added that the major candidates/parties resemble the combatants in the old “lite beer” commercials, where two theatrically angry sides faced-off to tear each other apart, Group A claiming the beer was less filling, and Group B that it tasted great.

Lack of substance, anyone?

The lite beer election: serious and dangerous questions

The Long View

Part 1

At a dinner with friends of both the Republican and the Democratic persuasion, the question was raised: Do we have adequate choices in this coming presidential election? No one could answer “yes.” I added that the major candidates/parties resemble the combatants in the old “lite beer” commercials, where two theatrically angry sides faced-off to tear each other apart, Group A claiming the beer was less filling, and Group B that it tasted great.

Lack of substance, anyone?

‘Buy American,’ the Founding Fathers said

The current uproar over the uniforms for the United States’ Olympic team being made in China should not have surprised Americans. Last Christmas season, I went shopping for a present for my wife, and discovered that in Brooks Brothers’ Manhattan flagship there were no women’s clothes that had not been made in China.