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The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Maybe it’s the name

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

The gala celebrating the 20th anniversary of the northwest Connecticut chapter of Habitat for Humanity Saturday was quite a success (see photo, Page A4). The support given freely to this organization seems at odds with the general feeling about affordable housing in the Northwest Corner, however. The homes built by Habitat are meant for area residents who would otherwise be unable to afford a house in the region, yet there are those who don’t seem to equate them with affordable housing.

Noteworthy milestones

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

It often takes an anniversary to recognize extraordinary commitment to service on the part of an organization. But it’s also human nature to take certain things for granted, either until they’re gone or until they have a milestone to celebrate. So it’s very good that a number of important area nonprofit groups are noting significant anniversaries this year. Organizations like these are examples of the best aspirations of those who live in and understand the more admirable ways of the Land of Steady Habits.

Two approaches to government transparency

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

There’s a certain irony in the fact that the governor and state Legislature have likely put open information in Connecticut at great risk, while the state’s judiciary has taken a step that improves the public’s access to the courts in a very real way.

Changes in zoning for town of Salisbury?

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Neighbors can’t always get along and they can’t always agree on the best approaches to handling their properties and changes to them. Matters of planning and zoning can become extremely contentious, despite what are often the best of intentions of all concerned, and can lead to problems that can seem insurmountable. People pay a lot of money for their properties and so want to be able to make changes as they see fit while at the same time maintaining some control over the changes their neighbors may make that would affect their viewsheds.

Transitions

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

A time of transition, a time of change: Annual graduations signify more than just a rite of passage. Changes of great magnitude, transformational, happen right on the heels of graduations, making them bittersweet for all those celebrating the successful conclusion of one phase of their lives.

There are some friends left behind, some friends made for life. Some teachers who will never be forgotten, whose lessons will carry their graduates forward and inspire them to achieve good things for the rest of their lives. Others will be too soon forgotten.

The weekend was darker than usual

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

This was a rough weekend for many Northwest Corner residents and several of the largest area businesses due to a lengthy power outage. The quick and damaging storm Thursday afternoon, June 9, brought down many trees and wires and created a bad situation with closed roads and lack of power. (See story, front page.) Throughout the state, and here, this storm seemed to be too much for CL&P to handle in a timely way.

Is open government at risk in Connecticut?

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Some Connecticut residents might take their Freedom of Information Commission for granted. It’s been in Hartford for 36 years, long enough so that many adults don’t remember how things went in matters of government accountability before the commission was created. But some do remember having no real recourse when government chose not to be transparent, no place to go to complain about lack of governmental openness and abuse of power. They’ll tell you it’s better now.

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The evidence of heart in our small towns

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

There was a quote by Bob Estabrook, this newspaper’s editor-and-publisher emeritus and a veteran himself, on the front page of last week’s Lakeville Journal. He said, “The heart of a small town is most evident on Memorial Day.”

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We take comments, but with some limitations

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Last week, The Lakeville Journal Company launched a new website, www.tricornernews.com, which has replaced the former site, www.tcextra.com, as the place online to find content of all kinds from our three newspapers covering the Tri-state region.

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Malloy toughed out state employee unions

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Nobody can say that Gov. Dannel Malloy doesn’t have guts. He faced down the state employee unions, and he squeezed $1.6 billion of concessions out of them over the next two years by not only threatening, but acting on, thousands of layoffs when at first those concessions did not materialize. Now, he’s backed down on the layoffs since the unions agreed to enough compromises to help him balance the state budget. Of course, he had hoped for $2 billion in concessions, but filled in the extra $400 million with cuts in spending and increased tax collection.

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