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Regulate corporate raiders

In this neo-Darwinian, “free” (i.e. deregulated) capitalist economy of ours, one of the easiest ways for an already-wealthy individual to get still wealthier on the backs of everyone else is by becoming an “investor” and “turnaround” specialist of the “corporate raider” variety. How is this done, and with what effect? What can be done about it?

What should be the liability for a tick bite?

As previously reported in The Lakeville Journal (April 4, 2013), a Connecticut jury has awarded $ 41.7 million to Cara Munn, a young person who contracted tick-borne encephalitis while on a Hotchkiss School-sponsored trip to China in 2007. Cara Munn suffered, and still suffers from, partial paralysis and speech impediment.

Presidential powers, guns, war powers, qualification for office, removal from office, impeachment and lawsuits

Basic Constitutional Law 101

Part 2 of 4

The language of the Constitution does get stretched. It gets stretched by the Judiciary, by the Legislature, by presidential executive orders and by sheer historical so-called “necessity.”

Presidential powers, guns, war powers, qualification for office, removal from office, impeachment and lawsuits

Basic Constitutional Law 101

Part 2 of 4

The language of the Constitution does get stretched. It gets stretched by the Judiciary, by the Legislature, by presidential executive orders and by sheer historical so-called “necessity.”

Free speech, campaign finance and national debt

Basic Constitutional Law 101

Part 1 of 4

You are probably surprised at times, as I am, how often many Americans, including some Supreme Court Justices, claim to worship the U.S. Constitution, apparently without having actually read it, or if they had, without having understood it. The purpose of this four-part column, “Basic Constitutional Law 101,” is to provide a remedial catch-up summary of what the Constitution says and means, starting with free speech.

Free speech, general welfare, power to tax and national debt

Basic Constitutional Law 101

Part 1 of 4

You are probably surprised at times, as I am, how often many Americans, including some Supreme Court Justices, claim to worship the U.S. Constitution, apparently without having actually read it, or if they had, without having understood it. The purpose of this four-part column, “Basic Constitutional Law 101,” is to provide a remedial catch-up summary of what the Constitution says and means, starting with free speech.

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Wheaton College case undermines Hobby Lobby

Just when we all were trying to understand the thinking of the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, along comes Wheaton College v. Burwell and the Court undermines its own jurisprudence in the earlier case.

The unnecessary war between science and religion

The last two centuries have witnessed an ever-widening gulf, a war really, between science and religion. It’s very unproductive. Does it have to be this way?

Many scientists have declared that because of our scientific advances in understanding the age, composition and development of the universe, as well as evolution of all forms of life in it, we no longer need a deity to explain it all. Some say it succinctly: “God is dead.”

How and why the zebra got its stripes

My brother Thom always warns: “ Don’t believe everything you think.” He’s so right!

Take the question: “How and Why did the zebra get its stripes? Scientists, that is to say the kind of people who invent “theories” of so-called “evolution” and “global climate change,” offer contradictory “scientific” answers to what should be a simple question with a simple answer. Look at these four “scientific” explanations. Zebras have stripes, but why?

(1) To camouflage the animal when it walks in the the light and shadows of the woods, swamps and jungles.

Time to return to due process of law

Part 1 of 2

The Constitutional
imperative

Mark Twain said that the Classics, that is the Great Books, are those that everyone quotes or refers to, but almost no one actually reads, or really thinks about. Great Documents surely include the U.S. Constitution, the Declaration of Human Rights, the Geneva Conventions and the International Convention Against Torture. Practically no one reads these documents or thinks about what they might mean in practice, so they fit Twain’s definition rather well.