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If You Ask Me

Party bases pick poor candidates in their closed primaries

While celebrating Tom Foley’s victory over veteran legislator John McKinney in the Republican gubernatorial primary four years ago, the party chairman predicted “our base will turn out in big numbers this November to overturn Malloy and his failed economic policies.”

Hoping my first newspaper lives to be 100

My high school yearbook had a section devoted to predictions on the future of graduating seniors — who would be president or maybe a star of stage, screen and radio. Mine predicted I would be “bylining in the Daily News.”

It didn’t happen, but I truly would have welcomed the experience. The Daily News was the paper I grew up with, the first paper I read or had read to me, starting with my grandfather reading the Sunday funnies, as the comic strips were then known, somewhere around 1937.

What do we know about the candidates for governor?

Depressing, isn’t it?

In a few days, a very small number of Connecticut voters will look over a field of not particularly well-known candidates and pick two of them to run for governor in November.

I suspect an even smaller number of voters can name all seven of the men whose names will appear on the Democratic and Republican primary ballots next Tuesday.

Don’t know much about history

There are certain qualities we once thought every president should have. He should never lie to us. He should try to unite us, be the president of all the people. He should know a lot about the U.S. Constitution and all of its amendments. 

And he should know history, especially ours. But this president neither seems to know or care much about what happened before his election.

What caused Trump to side with the enemy?

The headline on the column that appeared in this space on Feb. 8 asked, “What does Putin have on Trump?” Not a bad question, as things turned out.

After Helsinki, we should amend the question to read, “What does Putin have on Trump that caused the president of the United States to side with the enemy?”

Supreme Court won’t ignore public opinion

More than a century ago, Mr. Dooley, the Chicago Irish bartender created by journalist Peter Finley Dunne, sagely observed that, “the Soopreme Court follows the illiction returns.”

Today, the observation still stands, though it might be more accurate to say the 21st century Court follows the public opinion polls, which can be an even more reliable measurement of the nation’s will than the election returns.

A death in the family: Doing the work they believe in on a small newspaper

‘It’s like being a teacher or a nurse,” one reporter called his job after five colleagues were massacred in the newsroom of their small daily newspaper. “You get paid an honest wage to do work that you believe matters.” 

Since the tragedy, there have been many eloquent responses like this one, along with long overdue recognition of the role smaller newspapers like the Capital Gazette of Annapolis, Md., play in the life of the community and the nation.  

Five candidate primary doesn’t help Republicans

With Connecticut enjoying an economy that’s better than Louisiana’s and worse than the other 48 states, this would appear to be a likely year for the election of a Republican governor. 

Although a deep blue state, Connecticut has occasionally tired of long Democratic runs and given the Republican Party a chance to show what it can do with a governor — but not often a legislature — to call its own.  This looks like one of those years but it’s far from certain.

Check Trump’s ‘facts’ and don’t repeat them

After Joe McCarthy’s reign of terror in the name of anti-communism ended with his censure by the U.S. Senate, news organizations that unwittingly collaborated in his rise to power underwent a collective examination of conscience.  

Words you can say on TV and how they evolved

The recent vulgar eruptions by two television personalities, Roseanne Barr and Samantha Bee, brought to mind my own experience with words that were never to be uttered on the air. 

I had been with WTIC Radio and Television for a couple of years in 1965 when the radio station celebrated the 40th anniversary of its founding in 1925.

As part of the observance, I was asked to write a memo on the events of the year 1925 so that the disc jockeys and talk show hosts could provide the listeners with colorful anecdotes about the events of the year.