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Guest Commentary

Oh no! Not my meals and entertainment

That’s right. The new tax bill eliminates the meals and entertainment deduction, so no more golf games, theater tickets or supping on the IRS. The new 2018 tax act has thrown out these categories of deductions. 

45’s 45: What Twitter can tell us about our president

In past presidential Kremlinology, we used to look at what a president was reading: carrying under his arm onto Air Force One, say, or keeping top-of-desk in the Oval Office ­— what, for example, President Obama would purchase on his visits to Martha’s Vineyard bookstores. We could learn something, say something, about the man in charge. 

A current student’s view of HVRHS grading

My name is Mia Tittmann and I am a ninth-grader at Housatonic Valley Regional High School. Of course there have been changes to the school over time, but the response to them has never reached this point.

A Housy graduate’s view of the grading controversy

I hear things from current students about how things at Housy (Housatonic Valley Regional High School in Falls Village) are going these days, and I have to say that I’m so glad to have graduated before the ongoing controversy there arose. Between student protests, NYPs and an administration that has reportedly banned students from saying “Housy,” it seems like a real mess these days. 

How will the changes in the U.S. tax law affect us all?

Part 2 of a series

The 2018 Tax Act limits the deduction of state and local income, real estate, personal property and sales taxes to a total of $10,000 per return, regardless of filing status or amount paid. It also eliminates exemptions and gives a break to the self-employed. 

I tested four wide-ranging scenarios for the effect of the tax act. Here are the results:

So much for filing your taxes on a postcard

Part 1 of a series

 

No, after the new tax law you will not be able to file your taxes on a postcard.  In fact, the tax law just got more complex, which should surprise no one. Keep in mind that the new law applies to 2018, and not to 2017, except in almost unnoticeable details.  

There’s a good case for change

New England holds a great sense of pride in its history and tradition. This is certainly to be expected, as each one of us tends to hold onto what we are proud of in our past and what we have come to know.

Beware the three-horned dodo

Recently, I had a close call with serious injury because of a thoughtless driver. These two ancient references immediately came to mind. I will amend them both at the end of my tale.

First: Euclid, the great ancient geometer, famously said to a king having difficulty with his attempt to learn geometry, “There is no royal road to learning geometry.” 

Second: The Roman Empire was celebrated for its network of roads that linked all to Rome, i.e., “All roads lead to Rome.”

After 9/11, a return to normalcy — almost

Conclusion

 

Sept. 14 — On Friday I took my two cats and some books and left New York for our house in the country. More than anything else I wanted to be away from the stress and the noise and to be in the one spot on earth that is most profoundly home to me. And yet, when the train left 125th Street in Harlem and crossed the bridge to the Bronx and upstate New York, I felt deep sadness, as if I was abandoning a much beloved and wounded animal — I love this city like no other.

9/11 was followed by a day of ghostly silence

Part II

 

Sept. 12 — I woke up early because of the deadly quiet outside; there were no screaming sirens, no car horns, nothing — I wondered about that silence and worried that this was a very bad sign — that it meant that there were no survivors being transported to the hospitals in the neighborhood.