Login

Food for Health

Foraging for ramps, and being foraged by ticks

There are lots of fun reasons to go out in the woods at this time of year. There are salamanders to track, peepers to listen to and of course wild foods to pick and take home for dinner.
But there’s also a good reason for wanting to avoid the woods at this time of year: ticks. They’re back in abundance already. A few people theorized over our long hard winter that the cold and snow would kill the ticks, but it turns out they were wrong.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

What’s new in the culinary world of eggs

From a culinary point of view I associate Easter with ham and lamb, but apparently that’s wrong; Easter is supposed to be about eating eggs. Not just, “Oh, we might as well eat the eggs we used for the egg hunt,” but egg eating in a more intentional way. I think I heard this on the radio or something last week, or read it in a newspaper article, so it must be correct.
Easter is now over so this column is a little late but this week’s featured food is what used to be called, in my youth, The Incredible Edible Egg.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Some thoughts to chew on when eating alone …

I’d always thought that I’d hate cooking for just myself, that I’d become one of those people who eats ramen every night.
In fact, I’ve discovered that I just love cooking for myself and only myself. I’m so much less fussy than everyone else I cook for (haha). Well, what that actually means is that I’m cooking exactly what I want to eat, exactly the way I want to eat it. And that’s a wonderful thing.
There is the question of portions (usually once you start to cook, it’s easier and more efficient to make a larger portion).

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

All the fuss about enriched pasta

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

One of our reporters who shall remain nameless (Hint: He is a bachelor and does his own cooking) feels very strongly that pasta that has been enriched is not worth eating. Although he is not generally a fussy kind of guy, he becomes positively libertarian when it comes to spaghetti, and he just doesn’t want to eat noodles that the government has been tinkering with.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Tomatoes, delicious any season

Every summer, our family grows tomatoes. Planting them, watching them grow and, finally, eating or cooking them is a fun process. 
There are many types of tomatoes you can grow. My favorites are cherries and some of the heirloom varieties. 
The cherry tomatoes are small and, when sliced in half, are perfect to put on top of a salad or pasta. They come in different colors — a few different reds as well as oranges and yellows. There are even brown or chocolate cherries now.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Lovely, when you get to know them

I’ve always had odd eating habits. Up until I was 8 or 9 years old, I would only eat white foods — except for fruit rollups and candy, of course. 
As I’ve grown older I’ve become more adventurous and have expanded my palate in many ways. For example, I tried fish when I was 14, and later sushi, and I loved both. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Show the love to quinoa, and get health and flavor

I haven’t always loved quinoa. In fact, the first time I tried it I didn’t like it at all. I was at my friend’s college apartment for dinner, and she suggested taking a whack at using this tricky ingredient. 
We were both excited about the prospect of trying something new, and supposedly very healthy, and jumped right into the task without looking at the directions with a careful eye. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

For citrus, winter weather wasn’t the problem

On a recent trip to Florida I decided to do an in-depth study on the health of American citrus fruit this season.
I had assumed that the weird weather and heavy snows in the south have had a negative impact on the crop. I was wrong.
Tim Brown is a third-generation farmer, whose family has been growing citrus and other fruits and vegetables in Sarasota for the past 99 years.
The weather this year has been fine, he said. But two diseases have been reducing the amount of sellable fruit.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Mushrooms deserve second look, for antioxidant qualities

Well, I like mushrooms just fine, and I knew they had selenium, a cancer-fighting antioxidant. I never would have imagined they were anything more than kinda good for you, though; they seem so bland.
Apparently they are the Clark Kent of the nutritional world, however. A paper published in 2012 by the National Institutes of Health calls mushrooms one of the most powerful cancer-fighting tools around, and also says they can help counteract all the negative effects of chemotherapy (nausea, anemia, bone marrow suppression and lowered resistance).

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

All together now: Moderation

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

Well, of course it’s frustrating when health experts and people you trust change their opinions about what we should be eating. Why wouldn’t it be?
But on the other hand, perhaps we’re being too literal about how we respond to those recommendations. After all, just because someone tells you kale is beneficial and fights cancer, that doesn’t mean you need to eat it for breakfast every day.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.