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Food for Health

Bone broth and beautiful people

Sure, the weather is creeping up into the 40s and the sun is brighter and we’ve sprung the clocks ahead, sure, I know all that, but let’s be honest here: Winter is not over, and it won’t be for at least a few more (seemingly endless) weeks.

What does it mean when milk is raw?

An advisory was issued by the Connecticut Department of Agriculture (DOA) several weeks ago, warning consumers not to buy or eat cheese from The Butterfield Farm.

The owner of Butterfield Farm, Tara Bryson, had been charged with keeping her goats there in substandard living conditions (in fact, several of the goats had died from cold and malnutrition and the rest have been seized by the state).

The warning was for a different matter, however.

Beer, football and the ancient Egyptians

This is going to be one of those Santa Claus/Easter bunny moments for some of you out there, especially athletes who are my age (let’s just say that includes all who’ve passed the half-century mark).

Back in the 1970s (I know, not one of the exemplary eras for healthy living), I had friends who were marathon runners and tri-athletes, and one of them swore to me that drinking beer was part of his nutrition regimen. It has hops, he used to say, and those help restore some of whatever it is your body loses when it sweats a lot.

Kimchi is popular in New England as well as Korea

It would seem that there is no escaping kimchi, the ubiquitous and fragrant Korean specialty food. And I’m not just saying it’s ubiquitous in Korea (where it’s apparently eaten at three meals a day); it also seems to be inescapable even here in New England. Whoever still thinks of this as a Yankee pot roast and white bread region is wrong. 

I am not a big fan of kimchi. I think it’s smelly and kind of, well, red. 

How to safely store your Thanksgiving leftovers

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

Maybe not today and maybe not tomorrow but sometime real soon you’re going to be thinking hard about how to store your Thanksgiving meal leftovers. 

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Good for what ails your tummy

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

All pronouncements about foods and their relative levels of being good for you or not good for you should be taken with a grain of (figurative) salt. 

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Have a smoking good time with warming foods

It’s cold and damp outside and time to eat foods that make you feel warm. Cocoa, obviously, is a good choice. Iced tea and lemonade, obviously bad choices. Ice cream? No.

Lentils? Yes, especially if you eat them when they are warm (as opposed to cold, on a salad, which is also very yummy but not particularly warming).

All warm foods, obviously, are warming (hello). Lentils are doubly warming, however; they are also included in the list of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s warming foods (I think it has something to do with the qi or air flow in your body).

Whatever the color, eggplants have their virtues

In a way, it doesn’t matter that there are so many types of eggplant, and that so many of them are so beautiful. Once they’ve been cooked, they lose their looks, especially if you are making classic eggplant dishes (caponata, ratatouille, parmigiana, pizza). 

Carrots won’t give you super vision

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

It never ends, the revision of our favorite food myths. Now it turns out that carrots aren’t actually very good for your eyesight. Bugs Bunny, where are you? Will we learn next that spinach doesn’t give us super-strength equal to that of Popeye the Sailor Man?

Chickpeas can help boost brainpower

cythiah@lakevillejournal.com

This week’s health page is devoted to the chef/cookbook author Paula Wolfert, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and is using cooking, recipes and food to help keep her brain stable and strong; and who is now an unofficial spokesperson for the Alzheimer’s Association.