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Food for Health

Craving for cauliflower

 
I almost never get sick, no doubt because I eat all the healthy foods showcased in this column. But for the past two weeks I’ve been laid low by the same upper respiratory illness (not sure if it’s a cold or flu, I can never get that straight) that seems to have hit everyone in America at the same time that the Affordable Care Act started up and the federal government shut down. 

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Mix and match pumpkins and squash

 
I very cavalierly use squash and pumpkins interchangeably when I cook, because as far as I’m concerned it’s all spinach. But also, I tend to mix together a bunch of different squash and pumpkin flesh whenever I make anything, because the flavor is better. 

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When life hands you pears, make apple-pear sauce

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

As long as we’re talking about potassium anyway, it turns out conveniently that pears (which I was going to write about anyway) are sodium-free and are rich in potassium. As discussed in that other story (which is, as mentioned, on this page), potassium acts as a sort of brake on sodium and helps keep it from raising your blood pressure and doing other damage to your body.

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Good home-packed lunches can take time and thought

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

Reading about school lunches on the Internet makes me want to lie down in a dark room with a washcloth over my eyes until summer vacation. There’s too much anxiety and bossiness.
The Obama administration has, with genuine hope and compassion I’m sure, released new food guidelines for school lunches. As you would expect, they warn that obesity in children is on the rise and that school lunches should be healthier and have less sugar and more whole grains.

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Goat-niks, all hail the creamy, tangy yogurt

 
Goats are weird animals. Beyond their appearance, which is a world of oddity in itself, they eat thistles, wood and metal, good foods for Survivor — not for nutrition. There cannot possibly be a tangible benefit to eating through a lead chain, as one farmer described.
I can only conclude that goats are some sort of anomaly, designed by a bored god with a strange sense of humor.

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Goat-niks, all hail the creamy, tangy yogurt

Goats are weird animals. Beyond their appearance, which is a world of oddity in itself, they eat thistles, wood and metal, good foods for Survivor — not for nutrition. There cannot possibly be a tangible benefit to eating through a lead chain, as one farmer described.
I can only conclude that goats are some sort of anomaly, designed by a bored god with a strange sense of humor.
Yet goats (and their by-products) seem to have a cult following. Many websites tout the exclusive health benefits of goat milk: extra protein, easier digestion and a tendency to be more naturally processed.

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Chocolate: Healthy recipes from the dark side

 
The Lakeville Journal interns have been very good this summer at choosing healthy foods to talk about on this page (even if the recipes end up being a little indulgent). 

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Lemons: The sweet flavor of summer days

The first time I ever saw a lemon slice as a child, I thought it looked so pretty that I just had to try it. A few tears later, I realized that even though it looked just like an orange except for its color, this was one fruit I wouldn’t be able to eat as a snack.
However, for a fruit that isn’t that much fun to eat (at least, not to a kid!), lemons have proved to be incredibly useful — not only for their medicinal uses as standard home remedies, but also for their nutritional value and culinary uses.

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Peaches are so scrumptious. Make them into muffins!

 
Fruit salad is by far one of my favorite things to make. It can serve as breakfast, a side dish, or an after-dinner dessert, and it can be artistically arranged to look like it took more time to make than it did. It can be the perfect thing to bring to a picnic. 

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Finally a food the interns like: cucumbers

Lately, the interns at The Lakeville Journal have been pretty down on healthy food.
Whether we were turned off by the texture, force-fed too much as children, or simply want to stand our ground as doughnut-loving young adults recently released from school and independent in all aspects of our life, including our diet, we have seemed to take all anger and oppression out on most levels of the health pyramid.

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