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The Chris Powell Column

Too much college but not enough education

Gov. Malloy’s plan to throw another $1.5 billion at the University of Connecticut, this time for technical education, may not be received so enthusiastically outside the higher-education apparatus, and not just because the UConn men’s basketball team is disqualified from tournament play this year.

Mental illness: A crime issue?

 

More treatment for mental illness is the most pious appeal resulting from the Newtown school massacre. But as with the appeals for more restrictions on guns — outlawing scary-looking rifles and large-capacity magazines, prohibitively taxing ammunition, requiring background checks for gun purchasers — there is little relevance to what actually happened in Newtown. The massacre is just being adapted to longstanding political agendas.

Reality displaced by obliviousness

For a moment, reality flashed above Connecticut politics as the new speaker of the state House of Representatives, Hamden Democrat J. Brendan Sharkey, said that state financial grants to municipalities will have to be reduced in the next state budget.

A flash of reality: then, obliviousness

For a moment, reality flashed above Connecticut politics as the new speaker of the state House of Representatives, Hamden Democrat J. Brendan Sharkey, said that state financial grants to municipalities will have to be reduced in the next state budget.

Malloy’s excellent plan to reduce energy costs

While details still need to be settled, Governor Malloy has offered a compelling vision for the future of energy use in Connecticut — greatly increasing the accessibility of natural gas.

The surge in domestic production of natural gas is well known, though its sustainability remains in question, as it relies on the possibly polluting technique of “fracking,” breaking into underground gas reservoirs with jets of chemically treated water. Not well known, as the Malloy administration notes, is that Connecticut’s natural gas infrastructure is terribly weak for a densely populated state.

Malloy’s excellent plan to reduce energy costs

The Chris Powell Column

While details still need to be settled, Governor Malloy has offered a compelling vision for the future of energy use in Connecticut — greatly increasing the accessibility of natural gas.

The surge in domestic production of natural gas is well known, though its sustainability remains in question, as it relies on the possibly polluting technique of “fracking,” breaking into underground gas reservoirs with jets of chemically treated water. Not well known, as the Malloy administration notes, is that Connecticut’s natural gas infrastructure is terribly weak for a densely populated state.

Freedom of Information issues go beyond guns

Now the campaign to outlaw gun ownership is turning to publicizing the names and addresses of gun license holders. The other day a newspaper in New York posted on its Internet site a map pinpointing local gun license holders, and in Connecticut the House chairman of the General Assembly’s Public Safety Committee, state Rep. Stephen D. Dargan, D-West Haven, proposes to repeal the exemption in the state’s freedom-of-information law to make gun licenses here public records too.

Strengthening FOI law must go beyond guns

The Chris Powell Column

Now the campaign to outlaw gun ownership is turning to publicizing the names and addresses of gun license holders. The other day a newspaper in New York posted on its Internet site a map pinpointing local gun license holders, and in Connecticut the House chairman of the General Assembly’s Public Safety Committee, state Rep. Stephen D. Dargan, D-West Haven, proposes to repeal the exemption in the state’s freedom-of-information law to make gun licenses here public records too.

State’s economic disaster only worse for being bipartisan

Maybe every governor thinks he’s going to be different. Certainly Gov. Dannel Malloy did during his campaign two years ago and his first few months in office, what with his criticism of the financial legerdemain and dishonesty on which his recent predecessors had relied. Malloy pledged to stop that stuff by following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. But Connecticut’s economic collapse, precipitated by those predecessors, turned out to be too overwhelming.

State’s economic disaster only worse for being bipartisan

Maybe every governor thinks he’s going to be different. Certainly Gov. Dannel Malloy did during his campaign two years ago and his first few months in office, what with his criticism of the financial legerdemain and dishonesty on which his recent predecessors had relied. Malloy pledged to stop that stuff by following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. But Connecticut’s economic collapse, precipitated by those predecessors, turned out to be too overwhelming.