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The Chris Powell Column

State govt.’s duplicity fails to save hospitals

Connecticut’s hospital problem has just bounced back into state government’s lap now that Tenet Healthcare Corp. has withdrawn its applications to purchase Waterbury Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital in Waterbury, Bristol Hospital, Manchester Memorial Hospital and Rockville General Hospital.

State govt.’s duplicity fails to save hospitals

Connecticut’s hospital problem has just bounced back into state government’s lap now that Tenet Healthcare Corp. has withdrawn its applications to purchase Waterbury Hospital and St. Mary’s Hospital in Waterbury, Bristol Hospital, Manchester Memorial Hospital and Rockville General Hospital.

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Gag order canceled, but ignorance remains policy

No ruder blow against liberty has been struck in Connecticut in modern times than the one struck the other day by Superior Court Judge Steven Frazzini when he ordered the Connecticut Law Tribune not to publish a report about a child-custody case.

Gag order canceled, but ignorance remains policy

No ruder blow against liberty has been struck in Connecticut in modern times than the one struck the other day by Superior Court Judge Steven Frazzini when he ordered the Connecticut Law Tribune not to publish a report about a child-custody case.

The wrong study asks the wrong questions

Answers are determined by questions, and with great flourish the General Assembly has appointed a special committee of 15 worthy citizens to ask the wrong questions. That is, the committee is to study Connecticut’s tax structure — “to develop revenue-neutral policy options to modernize the current tax system, with the goals of increasing the system’s simplicity, fairness, economic competitiveness, and affordability.”

Budget chief confesses nothing was fixed

With the election safely out of the way by a couple of weeks and Governor Malloy and the Democratic administration returned to power, it has been disclosed that the state budget is facing a deficit of about $100 million and state budget director Ben Barnes has remarked that state government seems to be in “a period of permanent fiscal crisis.” Many items in the budget will have to be cut at the governor’s discretion where the law allows.

Connecticut’s worst pious fraud: education

As the recent campaign for governor and the General Assembly demonstrated, government and politics in Connecticut are full of pious frauds. 

Gun control makes suburbanites who were already safe feel safer while doing nothing for Connecticut’s cities, which experience a handgun murder almost every day. 

Nader: No excuses — you have the power

Running for president two years ago, U.S. Rep. Ron Paul was said to occupy the “whiplash point” on the political spectrum, uniting the libertarian right with the anti-war left. Paul has retired from politics, but Winsted’s Ralph Nader, 80, while two years older than Paul, is still going strong, and his new book envisions a potential political majority arising from the seeming opposites that Paul attracted.

The Palestinian principle: The worst defeat is peace

Among nations only Israel is expected to provide food, water, electricity and medicine to its enemy in wartime, an enemy that long has been sworn to Israel’s destruction and has been attacking the country for years.

This has been the story of Gaza since the Hamas movement took power there, and Israel has complied with such ridiculous expectations. Since Israel has been the great enabler of Gaza under Hamas, the Gaza problem has been Israel’s own fault.

‘Private’: Welfare fraud and UConn foundation

When state and federal laws were enacted to require confidentiality for applications for government welfare programs, they surely did not mean to conceal the identities of government employees who applied fraudulently. Yet that is how the law is being interpreted in Connecticut in regard to the nearly 200 state employees who fraudulently applied for emergency food assistance in 2011 after Hurricane Irene.