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The Chris Powell Column

A healthy population is a conservative goal

The Chris Powell Column

What is it with conservatives and their obsession about repealing the federal law that aims to achieve medical insurance for all citizens?
Yes, the law may be too bureaucratic and some of its details are fairly questioned. But what’s wrong with its premise — that government should see that everyone has decent medical insurance and medical care?

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Nelson Brown helped Connecticut get past corrosive religious rivalry

The Chris Powell Column

Fifty-three years have passed since Nelson C.L. Brown II, Republican of Groton, was speaker of Connecticut’s House of Representatives, but the reception line at his wake at the state Capitol the other day would have done honor to any current denizen of the building.

For Brown never really left. He went on to have a long career as a lobbyist, representing, among others, the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information, and retired only a few years ago, already in his 80s.

Has Malloy had enough yet with the unions? And, oblivious at UConn

The Chris Powell Column

As he laid off state troopers and prison supervisors in unions that rejected the pay freeze he sought (before becoming immersed in storm cleanup duties), maybe Gov. Dannel Malloy at last had enough of collective bargaining with state government employees.

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Has Malloy had enough yet with the unions? And, oblivious at UConn

The Chris Powell Column

As he laid off state troopers and prison supervisors in unions that rejected the pay freeze he sought (before becoming immersed in storm cleanup duties), maybe Gov. Dannel Malloy at last had enough of collective bargaining with state government employees.

Malloy Should Renegotiate, This Time For The Public

The Chris Powell Column

When it comes to the concessions agreement that recently failed the state employee union coalition’s complicated ratification process, what’s the difference between “clarifying” and “renegotiating”?
“Clarifying” is what Gov. Malloy said he was willing to do about the rejected agreement. “Renegotiating” is what the unions want him to do but what he said he wouldn’t. The other day they agreed to start talking again. About what remains to be seen.

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Could Dodgers return to Brooklyn? If only ...

The Chris Powell Column

With the Los Angeles Dodgers filing for reorganizational bankruptcy, some people, encouraged particularly by the New York Sun, are musing about returning the baseball team to Brooklyn, where it was central to the identity of the working-class borough, smashed racism with the hiring of Jackie Robinson and other great black players and contributed the best part of the golden age of New York baseball.

Not really much opportunity in Connecticut outside of government

The Chris Powell Column

Gov. Malloy and the other Democrats in charge congratulated themselves a couple of weeks ago on the orderly conclusion of the 2011 session of the General Assembly. Everything the majority wanted to do got done in time.

But as it all was facilitated by the largest tax increase in Connecticut’s history, this orderliness wasn’t much of a challenge or a virtue. Rather, it was the consequence of a betrayal.

Legislative session seemed more delusional than it was liberal

The Chris Powell Column

According to The New York Times, the Connecticut legislative session just concluded was the most “activist” and “liberal” session in memory as the state’s first formally Democratic governor (remember Lowell Weicker?) in 20 years got to work with another overwhelmingly Democratic General Assembly to enact the biggest tax increase in the state’s history.

Only the poor need Connecticut’s cities

The Chris Powell Column

Celebrating the obvious in a 28-page study aimed at political candidates, the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities proclaimed late last year that Hartford, Bridgeport, New Haven and Waterbury are poor and have special needs and thus a special claim on state government’s resources.
No one would dispute the poverty. But the report’s argument for pouring still more money into those cities was weak.

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Silly you if you thought concessions meant cuts

The Chris Powell Column

When Gov. Malloy announced that he would seek $2 billion in concessions from the state employee unions in the next budget cycle, a billion a year for two years, most people assumed that these concessions were to come out of the compensation state employees already were receiving.