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DOVER PLAINS — Equipped with signs and banners declaring their resistance in brightly colored letters, an estimated 70 area protesters rallied together at 2241 Route 22 across the street from the construction site of the Cricket Valley Energy Center (CVEC) to speak out against the power plant’s development last Saturday, July 13. In addition to the familiar faces that have been protesting CVEC since the beginning, were Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir from the New York City based Earth-defending performance community Earthalujah! as well as folksinger Pat LaManna, the...

Regional News

CSA farmer hat one of many worn by the Ridgways

This is part two in a series of articles on Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs) in the Tri-state region. 
 

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Farmers work to pry open the doors of opportunity

Fewer farmers. Farms that skew larger. Less agriculture overall. 
Those are the trends reported in the just released 2017 Census of Agriculture, a large body of data put together by the U.S. Department of Agriculture every five years. Fourteen million acres of U.S. farmland ceased to be used for agriculture, marking the loss of 70,000 farms. 
A group of Connecticut farmers who envision an alternate trajectory met this month at Gifts of Love Farm in Simsbury for the New CT Farmer Alliance (NCTFA) spring shindig and policy listening session. 

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Watching beloved trees wither and die

My grandfather’s generation lost the American chestnut to an exotic fungus that reduced this once mighty forest giant to old roots and hopeful shoots. 
My parents saw the American elms that used to shade our streets in broad allées felled by the one-two punch of Dutch elm disease and the elm bark beetles that helped to spread it. I am watching the next great killer of trees advancing through the woodlands today, and now that I know what I am seeing, I find it everywhere I go.

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Gray skies, bright bounty at Easter egg hunts

The weather was gray and gloomy on Saturday, April 13, when several towns hosted their annual Easter egg hunts. None of the children seemed to care. They weren’t looking up at the sky, their eyes were locked on the ground and the colorful plastic eggs scattered across the lawns of the Scoville Memorial Library in Salisbury, Lawrence Field in North Canaan and the lawns in front of and behind Town Hall in Kent (children under 5 were in front of the municipal building, children 6 and older were in back).

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Gov. Lamont vows to start turning Connecticut around

TORRINGTON —  Gov. Ned Lamont told the members of the Northwest Hills Council of Governments (NHCOG) that the state’s financial woes will not be corrected immediately — but they will be corrected. 
Lamont came to a special NHCOG meeting at the University of Connecticut’s Torrington campus on Friday, April 12. The organization is made up of the first selectmen from 21 Northwest Corner towns.
Lamont began by saying he’d only been in office for 90 days. “You can’t blame me for everything yet.”

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Jesus wept: eyewitnesses to devastation of Notre Dame

Two Northwest Corner residents were in Paris on Monday, April 15, as flames destroyed the roof and spire of Notre Dame Cathedral. 
Michelle Alfandari of Sharon was taking her 7-year-old great-nephew, Hudson Albanese, and his mother, Paula, on the young man’s first visit to Paris. 
On Monday morning they had stopped by the plaza outside the cathedral and snapped happy photos on a sunny day. 
And then they decided not to go inside just yet. They would wait until another day, later in the trip. 

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Plastics for thought

We visited the Massachusetts town of Northampton one recent spring Saturday, lunched at an Irish pub, shopped at a used CD shop and emporiums of unnecessary but interesting goods and took in the “Plastic Entanglements” exhibit at the Smith College Museum of Art.
I had low expectations of the art show, given its name, but was pleasantly surprised. 
An international array of artists transformed found plastic objects into fascinating sculptures and “paintings.” 

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Spring is the time to find a local CSA

This is part one in a series of articles on Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs) in the Tri-state region. 
 
When I first started working on CSA farms 14 years ago, no one that I knew had ever heard of the concept. 
Increasingly, the term CSA has become more familiar.
In her book “Sharing the Harvest” CSA farmer Elizabeth Henderson explains, “The premise is simple: create a partnership between local farmers and nearby consumers, who become members or subscribers. 

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Trees for Tribs grant to restore stream-side buffers

kaitlinl@millertonnews.com

WASSAIC — Thanks to significant funding from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), the Housatonic Valley Association (HVA) will now be able to plant more than 3,000 native trees, plants and shrubs in support of the NYSDEC’s Trees for Tribs program.

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Sappy eggs

We visited a maple sugarhouse. The sweet miasma penetrated our winter jackets and we inhaled it for several days. 
It was the first time I’d seen a reverse osmosis machine in use — it removes a percentage of the water before the sap is sent to the wood-fired evaporator to be reduced further into syrup.

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