Login

Movies

Risky New Ways To Tell This Classic Tragedy

Movies: ‘Anna Karenina’

The director of “Anna Karenina,” Joe Wright, has taken a big risk. Rather than make a conscientious costume drama like his two previous films, “Pride & Prejudice” and “Atonement,” he’s heavily stylized the telling of the story, setting it in a theater, not as a play for an audience, but as a framing or distancing device. The actors stride from one set to another, from stage to backstage wings to a catwalk in the rafters, quickly establishing in compact and concise scenes, the enormous cast of characters and the Imperial Russian setting.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Signs of Cultural Decay

‘The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2’
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

I am a cultural conservative. I found this out after watching Bill Condon’s legitimately awful “Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part Two.”
Why am I a cultural conservative? Because I dislike — intensely — the cavalier way in which absolute artistic verities are discarded in order to create highly dubious movies.
What am I talking about? I am talking about hipster vampires who have no problem walking around in the day time. I am talking about werewolves who just twitch a little bit in order to turn — with no full moon or gypsy woman to point out the pentagram on the palm.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Triumph in Every Way

Movies: ‘Lincoln’

Not exactly biopic, nor hagiography, “Lincoln” is the story of a legislative battle that showcased Lincoln’s powerful moral leadership, but also his political and managerial skill, as he chose his moment, played on his popularity with the people, and forced the end to slavery, and the war, in close succession.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Elegant, Playful and Entertaining

Movies: ‘Skyfall’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

This latest, “Skyfall,” one of the best installments in the 50-year-old James Bond film franchise, erupts on the screen in a 20-minute, pre-title action sequence. After Bond (the craggy but uber-sexy Daniel Craig) chases an assassin across Istanbul’s rooftops, they drop into a moving train. You know you are in serious Bond-the-cool territory when Craig calmly shoots his white shirt cuffs while calmly walking up the train’s aisle in pursuit.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Bloodless Blockbuster

Movies: ‘Cloud Atlas’

David Mitchell’s popular 2004 novel “Cloud Atlas” may or may not be a great yarn; I wouldn’t know, since I haven’t read it. As an epic, $100 million, three-hour jaunt across centuries, it is an unwieldy, if somewhat diverting, mess of a movie.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Combining Movies, Food and Art

compass@lakevillejournal.com

A long time ago, somebody figured out that food and movies go together. So when Janet Crawshaw, associate publisher of The Valley Table, a magazine devoted to all things edible in New York’s Hudson Valley, announced that the sixth annual restaurant week would include four new restaurants in the northeastern part of the valley, Bob and Carol Sadlon got an idea.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Quibbles Aside, A Nice Story

Movies: ‘Searching for Sugarman’
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

Like a lot of Americans, I have never heard of Rodriguez, a late-’60s folk singer who released two albums that did not sell and then vanished into even greater obscurity.
Until now.
The only place Rodriguez was a star was South Africa, as it turns out, where his records were the soundtrack for the young liberal whites who eventually turned against the apartheid government.
Malik Bendjelloul’s documentary, “Searching for Sugar Man,” tells the story of how Rodriguez’s South African fans — journalists, music store owners, musicians —searched for the man.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

What Money Can And Can’t Buy

Movies: ‘The Queen of Versailles’
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Versailles, Louis XIV’s great stage set for playing out his theatrical drama of kingship and the near divinity of monarchs, has seduced visitors and dreamers for nearly 400 years with visions of wealth, splendor and beauty. But Versailles represented the apogee of a monarchy that, separated from its country by gilded gates and strict court protocol, would be destroyed by the French Revolution. Even the king and queen would lose their heads to the guillotine.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Wily and Witty

Movies: ‘Argo’

The film “Argo,” is two movies in one: a terrifically tense and dead-serious political thriller about American hostages in Iran, and a very funny irreverent satire of Hollywood. Both are successful, and both work together surprisingly well.
In 1979, after the overthrow of the Shah of Iran (the movie helpfully reminds us that this was orchestrated by the United States) and installation of the Ayotollah Khomeini, anti-American sentiment began to boil in Tehran.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

More of the Same, Only Less

Movies: 'Taken 2'

It has offensive stereotypes, shockingly brutal violence and a body count in the dozens. It is also a heck of a lot of fun. And that’s just “Taken.”
Now here’s “Taken 2.”
We find ourselves only weeks, we guess, from the events of “Taken.” The bodies of the Albanian bad guys are scarcely in the ground, and the grieving father (Rade Serbedzija) of the baddest of them is swearing to take his revenge on superspy Bryan Mills (Liam Neeson), who killed them all to rescue his daughter Kim (Maggie Grace).

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.