Login

Movies

Adrift in Another World

Theater: ‘Adrift in Macao’

The place is Macao, a seedy island off the southern coast of China known for gambling, drugs and lost souls. The time, 1952, the same year that “Macao,” a Hollywood picture starring Robert Mitchum and Jane Russell about gambling, drugs and lost souls came to your local RKO.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Where is Frank Baum When You Need Him?

Movies: ‘Oz the Great and Powerful’

The new prequel to “The Wizard of Oz” has a few moments of spirit, magic and heart; or perhaps I mean brains, heart and nerve, but it takes two dull dispiriting hours to get to them.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Vision of Hell

Movies: ‘Lore’

We will have to wait another 50 weeks until the next Oscars, but the German-Australian masterpiece “Lore” will certainly be in any discussion of best foreign-language picture, if not best picture, period.
It could well be the finest war movie ever made — not like a “Patton” or “The Hurt Locker,” but rather as a depiction of the horrors of war visited on ordinary people, families and children.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Incredulity Reigns

But the club members get in some good fishing

I am a founding member of a club called Cinema, Angling and Culinary Appreciation, or CACA.
The other members are my attorney, Thos.; Kurt from Oregon; Dr. Chuck; and my cousin Dan. Other emeritus members drift in and out.
We meet at my cabin in the Catskills, fish for trout all day, and in the evenings eat great bowls of gas-inducing stew from the slow cooker and watch the World’s Worst Films.
We have watched — and survived — “Manos: Hands of Fate.” We analyzed “Zombie Lake.” We cheered the evil warlock Troxartes in “Deathstalker II.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The Same Only Different

Two movies with much in common: “Amour,” and “Quartet.” Both are about aging musicians who centered their lives on their careers. Both contain remarkable performances; and both are beautifully directed. But there similarities end.
“Quartet” takes place at Beecham House, a cozily elegant English retirement home for aging musicians modeled on Casa di Riposo per Musicisti, the musicians’ retirement home outside Milan founded by Giuseppe Verdi and his wife. Fittingly, the movie centers on Beecham’s annual fundraising concert held on Verdi’s birthday.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Following the Plot, Jude Law Notwithstanding

Movies: ‘Side Effects’

Steven Soderbergh’s latest, and, possibly, last, movie (he’s announced his retirement to become a painter) is a pharmaceutical thriller. It dryly and matter-of-factly skewers our antidepressant hungry culture, asks who is at fault when a medicated patient goes haywire and allows the audience to indulge at length in the wonder that is Jude Law.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Awesome, Terrifying And Tone Deaf

Movies: ‘The Impossible’

You may never, ever sit through a more harrowing 114 minutes than these.
Awkwardly titled, perhaps from translation problems of this mostly Spanish-made movie, “The Impossible” is the putative true story of a vacationing family in Thailand that gets caught in the 2004 tsunami.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Immersed in British Suds? You’re Not Alone

Viewers of the hit PBS costume drama “Downton Abbey” received a rude shock last weekend when Sybil, youngest daughter of Lord and Lady Grantham, met an untimely demise to eclampsia after delivering a healthy baby girl.
There could not have been a dry eye among the legions of “Downton” fans. Sybil was the acknowledged “kindest and sweetest” of the three Crawley sisters; had ministered to the sick and wounded during WWI and identified with working-class struggles, rather too much for her traditionalist father when she married the household’s chauffeur.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Between Duty and Desire

In “Barbara,” a dissident East German doctor must choose between escaping to the West or helping an abused girl.
Barbara Wolff (Nina Hoss) is banished to a pediatric hospital in provincial East Germany in 1980. The film opens with Barbara arriving early for her first day of work. Striking, elegant and remote, she gets off the bus, checks her watch and sits on a bench for a smoke.
Her new boss, Dr. Andre Reiser (Ronald Zehrfeld) and an East German secret policeman, Klaus Schutz (Rainer Bock) are watching from a window. “She won’t be even one second early,” the Stasi agent says.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Delightful, Among The Year’s Best

In any other hands than David O. Russell’s, “Silver Linings Playbook,” the film adaptation of Matthew Quick’s quirky novel about mental illness — here bipolar disorder — would never have been made. In fact movie rights belonged to Sidney Pollock and his partner Anthony Minghella, both now dead, but they could find no way to script such a delicate subject.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.