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Hopper: The Drawings of a great painter

The Art Scene

Edward Hopper was a slow painter. He made many sketches, even finished drawings, of places and people before finally producing a finished oil. His process is on fascinating display in Hopper Drawing, now at the Whitney Museum of American Art.
Of course Hopper was hardly unique in drawing first then painting. But what the Whitney show makes clear is how he absorbed the reality he drew and synthesized it into a personal vision. Hopper himself said that the “fact” became the “improvisation” in his work.

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Unbridled: five equine paintings

Carrie Pearce and one of her horse paintings at Argazzi Art, 22 Millerton Road, Lakeville, CT through September. For information, call 860-435-8222, or go to www.argazziart.com

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Painting for Us A Vanished World

The Art Scene

Three Duncan Hannah “Fiction” paintings — small pictures of Penguin and Pelican paperback book covers — were the best works in a book-related show at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in 2010. Now Darren Winston, Bookseller, has mounted a larger exhibition of Hannah’s romantic, nostalgic art that shows some of the range of this interesting artist.

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Art in Lakeville

Khurshed Bhumgara of Sharon may have spent his public life as a venture capitalist, but in his private life he admires art and he makes art. With Constantin Brancusi’s “Endless Column” in mind, capable of infinite vertical repetitions, Bhumgara decided to make his own version of the Romanian artist’s work.
“I decided to try deconstructing it and then reconstructing it,” he said this week, as he piled his 76 bright yellow “slices of wood” as he calls them, all 1-inch-thick squares of repeated graduating widths, onto a vertical rod in the Gallery Arts Guild’s front yard.

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About Inness, And Man And Nature

The Art Scene

George Inness was a slow bloomer. While he had little formal training, on trips to France and Italy he studied the old masters and the contemporary Barbizon painters, with their emphasis on realism and soft tonalities. But his greatest work came in the last decade or so of his life, and when he died he was acknowledged as this country’s greatest landscape painter, both influential and controversial.

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Art With a Story

Art Scene

Fran Gormley is awesome. After growing up poor, her family often on welfare, she clawed her way into a scholarship at Fairleigh Dickenson University, graduated summa cum laude, earned a master’s degree in social psychology, then began a career in advertising and marketing. Later she founded her own brand management company, sold it, and then had the resources to pursue her hobby, photography, with a vengeance.
But not just ordinary photography or everyday fine art photography. Aerial photography.

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Imaginative, Experimental And Fascinating

The Art Scene

If you saw Henry Klimowicz’s work at The Hotchkiss Tremaine Gallery in early 2012, prepare to be surprised. The sculptor’s new show, which opens at The Morrison Gallery in Kent July 20, this Saturday, is a dramatic, mesmerizing exhibition of the artist’s growing confidence, expanding imagination and continuing experimentation.

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A Showy Start for Bard’s SummerScape

The Arts Scene

Bard’s SummerScape 2013 opened this month with a reimagined retrospective of “The Rite of Spring,” done as a performance piece combining dance — the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company — and theater ­— the SITI Company (Saratogi International Theater Institute) — both in residence at the college.

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A Building For Music, Dance, Theater, Film And Ideas

The Arts Scene

Having passed its first decade this year, the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts stands without equal in the Tri-state region. The building at Bard College in Red Hook, NY, designed by architect Frank Gehry, is the only modern, purpose-built structure in our area famed as much for its appearance as for what goes on inside it.

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Clams, Eggs and a Knowing Owl

The Art Scene

Hidden under The Wish House in West Cornwall, CT, the Souterrain Gallery is hosting a remarkable photography show from Catherine Noren and Lazlo Gyorsok.
Both Noren and Gyorsok are well known in the area. As a couple, their photography interests differ widely: He strives for drama, she for directness often mixed with surprise. Sometimes they cross into each other’s territory.

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