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SHARON — Christ Episcopal Church in Sharon hosted a program on Monday night, Sept. 30, about religion in Litchfield County during the Civil War. 

Peter Vermilyea, historian and teacher at Housatonic Valley Regional High School, spoke in the church’s parish hall before an audience of about 30 people.

He said Litchfield County’s religious history was an integral part of U.S. Civil War history. 

The author of “Hidden History of Litchfield County,” Vermilyea captivated the audience with tales about religious figures who...

Sharon

Sweet time at Sharon Audubon during MapleFest

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — Visitors from Connecticut, New York City and state and Boston turned out March 17 for the annual MapleFest at Sharon Audubon. There were children, babies in their parents arms and senior citizens —proving perhaps that no one is too old or too young to love the taste of maple syrup and to be fascinated by the process of making it.
Though the MapleFest was held on St. Patrick’s Day, there was no green maple syrup.

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Sharon Hospital lays off 26 employees

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — “Fluctuating volumes” of emergency room patients and hospital inpatients were given as a major reason for a significant reduction in staff at Sharon Hospital. The hospital’s president and CEO, Kimberly Lumia, also cited a substantial new tax levied on the hospital by the state as another reason for the layoff of 26 employees on Wednesday, March 21. "Our goal is to have a right-sized organization for the volume of patients, so we're back to our 2010 levels of staffing," Lumia said.

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Painterly photos of a bygone industrial world

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — Emery Roth II has had a lifelong passion for photography. When he retired from teaching six years ago, Roth began devoting himself to this passion, shooting photographic images almost every day since.
Roth said he lived near Connecticut’s Naugatuck Valley for a long time, and knew nothing about it other than that it was a different world from where he worked.
“About a year and a half ago I started exploring photographically what is left of its industrial past, as well as reading and learning about it.”

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Roadmap to digital future for schools

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — Jonathan Costa, who grew up in Sharon and now lives in Kent, understands how helpful the Internet and other technology can be for students in a rural region.
Costa, 49, graduated from Sharon Center School, Housatonic Valley Regional High School and Fairfield University and is now director of School and Program Services for Education Connection, a regional education service center in Litchfield. Among other things, Education Connection provides adult and continuing education for students in Region One (classes are held at Housatonic Valley Regional High School).

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Syrup this year is dark, plentiful

Audubon Maple Fest March 17
asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — At this time of year, buckets attached to maple trees are a common New England sight. The buckets or, in some cases, plastic tap lines collect sap from the maple trees and is then boiled down into the sweet, thick, amber liquid known as maple syrup. Some of the sap is further processed into maple sugar candy.
The Audubon Center in Sharon has long had a fully functioning sugar shack — the building where the clear sap is transformed into syrup.

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Unusual tutoring program a win-win for all

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — Sharon Center School Librarian Judy Gafney and Louis Pressman (who is chaplain and instructor at The Hotchkiss School), saw a need in each school and worked together to fill it.
Some Sharon students needed a little extra tutoring in some subjects. And a number of Hotchkiss students were looking for ways to volunteer in the community. Gafney and Pressman joined forces to develop a program that meets the needs of both sets of students.

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All welcome

Four church communities came together for a shared Ash Wednesday service in Sharon on Feb. 22. The service at St. Bernard Church was led by the Rev. John Widing (Christ Church Episcopal), the Rev. Terry Ryan and the Rev. Jody Guerrera (Congregational Church), the Rev. Kwang-il Kim (United Methodist Church) and the Rev. Francis Fador (St. Bernard and St. Bridget). Watch The Lakeville Journal for listings of Lenten services leading into Easter.

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Multi-tasking? It’s part of the job

Town clerks lead busy lives
asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — Sharon is a hospital town, which means the town clerk and her staff have more documents to file than those in other area towns.
For Sharon’s town clerk, Linda Amerighi, though, it’s all good.
“I’m never bored. I’m always learning something new.”
“The Connecticut Town Clerks Association once listed more than 300 different jobs town clerks are responsible for,” she told The Lakeville Journal.
During a one-hour interview with Amerighi in the town clerk’s office, it seemed 300 may be a low number.

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Town surrenders easement on field back to Keilty

asherp@lakevillejournal.com

SHARON — A special town meeting was held at Town Hall on Friday, March 2, to determine whether the town should surrender a drainage easement originally granted to Margaret Keilty on March 28, 1980. About 12 people attended the meeting including several media representatives.
Selectman John Perotti was elected moderator for the meeting. A motion was made to surrender the easement to Keilty. Perotti asked First Selectman Robert Loucks to give a brief background on the matter.
Loucks said the drainage easement was across Keilty’s field, which is on King Hill Road.

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Shelters sheltered by mild winter

SHARON — A handful of Region One students gathered at Silver Lake Conference Center in Sharon Saturday, Feb. 25, for an Outdoor Leadership Workshop sponsored by the Housatonic Youth Service Bureau.
Emily Abbott, a sixth-grader at North Canaan Elementary School, found the emergency shelter she and some friends built in December was still structurally sound. Of course, the shelter hasn’t had to withstand a typical New England winter.
The group decided to leave the shelters up until the next Outdoor Leadership Workshop in April, hoping to get some snow to put them to the test.

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