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Salisbury

SALISBURY — “Earthbound Buddha,” a show of new art by Karl Saliter, opens at Noble Horizons in Salisbury on Friday, Oct. 18, with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m.

In an interview at his studio at the end of September, Saliter said the works in the show depict “people in meditation and prayer — thinking earthbound thoughts.”

Anyone who has ever attempted to meditate and instead thought about how to pay for snow tires will be able to relate.

Saliter — a sculptor and performer at other times — used “found”...

Salisbury

New life for a venerable old inn

The Ragamont rises again
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The gracious Ragamont on Main Street, a Salisbury landmark, has taken on a new identity, the third since it’s been in the hands of Phillips “Pete” Hathaway.
Operating since the fall of 2009 as Enterprise New Life, a sober-living facility for men who had completed in-patient treatment for drug and alcohol addiction, it is now the Ragamont House — a bed and breakfast, home to a catering business and available for special events.
Hathaway said the work with the clients — he estimated that about 20 men came through Enterprise New Life in 14 months — was rewarding.

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Baby appears on boat in Sausalito

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — What stands 14 feet tall, took three years to make, and is lying on its back in a boat near Sausalito, Calif.?
A giant sculpture of a baby, created by David Hardy, a graduate of Salisbury Central School (1983) and The Hotchkiss School (1987).
Hardy, who now teaches at New York University and lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., made the giant baby in the late 1990s, when he was working as a property and set builder in the movie business.
He said the sculpture was made of odds and ends of fiberglass, styrofoam and “stuff I salvaged from sets.”

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Keeping track of park ownerships

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

LIME ROCK —When discussing the race track at Lime Rock Park, confusion often arises as to who owns what. Rick Roso, who handles public relations for the track, shared this explanation.
“Lime Rock Park is owned by Lime Rock Park, L.L.C., which is John ‘Skip’ Barber.
“The Skip Barber Racing School is owned solely by Skip Barber Racing School, L.L.C. A company called First Equity is a major shareholder.
“The Skip Barber Racing School (SBRS) was started in 1975 by John “Skip” Barber. In 2000, Skip sold the school in its entirety.

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Roll away the dew

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

The heavy fog on Easter Sunday, April 24, didn’t discourage a crowd of about 35 people from attending the ecumenical sunrise service at 6 a.m. at Lake Wononscopomuc.
Eric Chin, a Salisbury Central School student, stood across the lake on a dock of The Hotchkiss School and welcomed the sun with a trumpet solo. The sounds floated across the lake through the mist.

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Complaints about track noise are more of a hum than a roar

Lime Rock planning workshop
patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) held an unusual meeting Tuesday, April 19 — a meeting billed as a “workshop” — on the question of noise from the Lime Rock Park racetrack and the effect on residents of the village.
The bulk of the two hour and 46 minute meeting was devoted to remarks from the standing-room only crowd at Town Hall. P&Z Chairman Michael Klemens started off by saying the meeting was not to discuss whether the track should continue to exist, but to address the complaints from residents about noise and, to a lesser extent, traffic.

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Rotary Club to honor Baldwin, Brown, Williams

jenniferk@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — The Salisbury Rotary Club and Foundation will honor three citizens with its highest award Tuesday, June 7, at the Cornucopia Banquet Hall in Torrington.
Carl Williams, Jerry Baldwin and Digby Brown will receive Rotary’s highest honor, the Paul Harris Medal. Together the three have logged more than 75 years of community service.
Williams, a retired member of the Salisbury Board of Finance, has been a camp director, teacher and writer of doggerel.
Baldwin, a longtime banker in both Torrington and Salisbury, is now the owner of the new Caddie Shack in North Canaan.

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Talk on April 23: Why Arab uprisings were a surprise

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — The Hotchkiss School is hosting an unusual event Saturday, April 23, combining a serious discussion of the unrest in the Middle East — with comedy.
There will be a panel discussion (“Why Didn’t We See the Arab Uprisings Coming, and What Can We Learn from Them?”) with Carrie Rosefsky Wickham, an associate professor of political science at Emory University; John Edwin Mroz, president and CEO of the EastWest Institute, a think tank with offices in New York, Brussels and Moscow; and Karen Linehan Mroz, president of the Middle East Children’s Institute.

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Paddock’s history of iron industry fascinates listeners

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — It’s certainly not a new story, but the Scoville Memorial Library meeting room was filled to capacity on April 16 for a talk by amateur historian Richard Paddock on the iron industry in Salisbury.
After some minor computer programs that delayed the 2 p.m. start time, Paddock launched into some tales about the Barnum and Richardson Company and why it bought a facility in Chicago. The reason: They had an arrangement with the railroad there.

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Fishing derby goes on, despite raw, cold air

cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com

LAKEVILLE — The annual fishing derby for youngsters was held at Lake Wononscopomuc on the opening day of the fishing season (Saturday, April 16). It certainly wasn’t the coldest opening day in recent memory. And at least this year there wasn’t ice on the lake or snow on the grass around the pond.
But, reported Grove Manager Stacy Dodge, it was cold and blustery enough that many fishing families stayed home. Only 17 youngsters entered the derby.

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Meeting on Lakeville post office closure is April 21

patricks@lakevillejournal.com

SALISBURY — Rumors have circulated for years that one or more area post offices might be shut down by the federal government. Now it looks as though the Lakeville post office is on a list of facilities that might be closed by the United States Postal Service.
An informational meeting with representatives of the U.S. Postal Service is scheduled for Thursday, April 21, at 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall.

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