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Salisbury

SALISBURY — Downtown Salisbury is a mecca for holiday gift shopping. Among the vendors of useful and beautiful giftable items for men and women is Passports, at 14 Main St.

Passports manager and buyer Christopher Baetz gave a tour an offered gift tips recently.

It’s winter and the shop has  a glamorous warm clothing for women in a range of prices: caps with faux pompoms run $35, but the fox fur ones are $65, for example. 

There are warm capes that can be worn three ways. Best sellers at the store include a faux-fur ruffle scarf available in six...

Salisbury

Recognizing racism, and trying to eliminate it

SALISBURY — Gwendolyn VanSant, an organizational change consultant, gave a version of the training program she uses to promote racial justice in communities at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday, Nov. 16.
VanSant is the founder of Multicultural BRIDGE (Berkshire Resources for Integration of Diverse Groups through Education) in Lee, Mass.
She spent some time on definitions. She said “race” is not a biological term, but a term “created to get access to wealth and land.”

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Salisbury of two minds on middle school sports plan

SALISBURY — Region One Middle School and High School Athletic Director Anne MacNeil presented the Middle School Regional Athletics Proposal at Salisbury Central School on Nov. 14.
She had already presented the plan to three other schools in the region and would continue in the days that followed to present it to the remaining two schools.
More than 30 town residents and a few members of Salisbury Central’s Board of Education were in attendance for the board’s special meeting.

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SOARing with Disney songs

LAKEVILLE — SOAR (Seek, Originate, Aspire, Reach), the enrichment program at Salisbury Central School, presented “The Wonderful World of Disney: A Musical Revue” on Nov. 15 and 16 in the school cafeteria (which has a small curtained stage at one end).
The show began with Michael Berkeley playing “The Wonderful World of Color” on electric piano while the cast members ran into the cafeteria, past the audience, while singing the song.

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Wasting the chance to use power well

LAKEVILLE — James Forman Jr., a Yale law professor and author, told an audience at The Hotchkiss School on Friday night, Nov. 15, that in the year 2000 one in three African-American men was under “criminal justice supervision” and argued that America locks up too many people, especially minorities.
Forman, son of noted 1960s civil rights leader James Forman, was hosted by the Salisbury Forum.
Forman said he believes “mass incarceration is the civil rights issue of this generation.”

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Selectmen look at former China Inn

SALISBURY — At the regular monthly meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Monday, Nov. 4, the selectmen voted unanimously to spend up to $5,000 on a preliminary assessment of 343 Main St. in Lakeville, the site of the former China Inn restaurant.
First Selectman Curtis Rand said any future use for the property — housing, for instance — will likely require grant money from the state.
But the state bonding commission has not freed up any funds.

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Understanding racism and its roots

SALISBURY — Tim Parrish, author of the memoir “Fear and What Follows: The Violent Education of a Christian Racist,” spoke at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday, Nov. 9.
At the beginning of his remarks he said, “It’s easy to stereotype racists. Those aren’t the ones we have to worry about.” 
He repeated this toward the end of the talk.

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Veterans honored in Salisbury

SALISBURY — The Rev. Heidi Truax praised veterans for their “courage, fortitude and perseverance” at a Veterans Day ceremony at Salisbury Town Hall on Monday, Nov. 11.
The ceremony began with the four children of Chris Ohmen, commander of American Legion Post 70, leading the crowd of some 30 people in the Pledge of Allegiance.
Lloyd Wallingford sang “God Bless America.”

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New trees are growing thanks to Salisbury Association

SALISBURY —  The Salisbury Association has provided 15 red oaks and sugar maples for various locations in Salisbury and Lake-ville, including several parks and along Routes 44 and 41.  
The history of the Salisbury Association’s tree-planting program began in 1903 when it aided the town in the fight against Dutch elm disease. The old elms that had lined Main Street had been devastated by the disease, and by 1905 a total of 692 new trees were planted. 

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Thinking independently as a route to greater civility

SALISBURY — George Goens, author of “Civility Lost: the Media, Politics and Education,” set the tone at the Scoville Memorial Library on Saturday afternoon, Nov. 2, by greeting everyone who came to hear him speak with a handshake and a civil, “Hi, I’m George.”
He said American society is increasingly fragmented and uncivil. The former public school superintendent said the education system has a lot to do with the problem.

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Dam repairs at pond

Factory Pond was allowed to drain out for repair work on the dam. The repairs are minor and will be done in the next couple of weeks.

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