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Opinion/Viewpoint

In this new column, we will explore the ways that hobbies (especially ones that connect the head and the hands) can offer serenity and a healthy sense of accomplishment. Our first featured pair of hands belongs to The Lakeville Journal’s own Patrick L. Sullivan, who not only covers town events but also writes our popular fly-fishing column, Tangled Lines.

For Patrick, fishing is a source of solace and a respite from the stresses of his job. It’s an activity that’s almost completely silent, except for the sound of the water and the light whizz of his fishing line....

The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Turning Back The Pages April 28

75 years ago — April 1936
SALISBURY — John Erickson is doing some interior decorating at the Philip Warner house.
LAKEVILLE — William Smith had the misfortune to dislocate his left shoulder when he stepped backward and fell through an open trap door leading to the cellar of the wine store at the A&P store last Saturday. The injury was treated at Sharon Hospital, after which he was able to return to his home.
TACONIC — Norman Miller is driving a new coupe.

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Budgets of their times

This budget year has been for Connecticut, across the board, extremely difficult, with a plethora of thorny problems and no easy solutions. The state deficit of $3.5 billion for the 2012 fiscal year starting July 1 has been partially mitigated by the budget now ready to go on for approval by the tax and budget committees, and the House and Senate, in Hartford.

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The basics of pruning

The Garden Coach

Even experienced gardeners are stymied sometimes, especially when it comes to pruning. They often put off pruning for fear of making a mistake, but then wind up with an overgrown mess.
As a garden coach I find that a new set of eyes, a few simple suggestions of how to approach a problem and a good deal of pointing and talking with my hands usually gives a gardener the confidence and knowledge to proceed.

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First fruits

Nature's Notebook

There is a hemlock tree on Factory Brook in Cornwall with bark that looks as if it’s been gone over with a giant rasp. The outer bark has been chipped away like kernels on an enormous cob of corn, with the bits lying in a great heap by the tree roots. The tree will survive, and so will the very satisfied porcupine that feasted on its soft inner layers.

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To Kemba Walker: on the merits of reading a good book as well as playing basketball

If You Ask Me

Kemba Walker’s play this season was truly remarkable, as was his admission that he read his first book this year, his last at the University of Connecticut.
Remarkable too, and more than a little sad, is that so few — hardly a fan and only one or two reporters — seemed to notice or care.
The thinking seems to be, “He’s going to earn about $2 million next year, so why be concerned with his reading habits?”

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State employee unions help most by refusing

The Chris Powell Column

Despite the public’s growing resentment of the privileged position of Connecticut’s approximately 45,000 state employees, their unions may be doing the state a great favor by resisting Gov. Dannel Malloy’s demand for a billion dollars’ worth of concessions for each of the next two budget years, the equivalent of about $22,000 per employee per year, almost a quarter of their average compensation.

A cure for cancer: past failure, future hope

The Body Scientific

Childhood leukemia has yielded to treatment, but the treatment of many tumors of adults — of the lung, the pancreas, the liver or the brain — has not been as successful despite the resources that have been marshaled. A short column cannot explain the failures of the past, what we learned while failing or what the future might hold, but a recent book, “The Emperor of All Maladies — a Biography of Cancer,” by Dr. Siddartha Mukerjee (also of Columbia University), comes close. (Note: Dr. Mukerjee won the Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction this week for this book.)

Turning Back The Pages April 21

Turning Back The Pages

75 years ago — April 1936
The large cow barn on the Elmer Hosier farm went up in smoke last Sunday night shortly after 8 o’clock. The blaze was discovered by Hosier and John Hall, who was visiting the Hosier home at the time. The two and an employee on the place started to get out the 90 head of stock housed in the barn, and by fast work succeeded in rescuing all of them together with four horses.
SALISBURY — Lyman Ball is now stationed at the CCC Camp at Becket, Mass.
LAKEVILLE —Master Clark Peterson on Wednesday caught a rainbow trout weighing 1 1/4 pounds in Burton Brook.

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Lakeville needs its post office to stay open

The Lakeville Journal Editorial

Isn’t it funny how people take certain things for granted and believe those things will always be there no matter what evidence there is to the contrary? Such is the case with the local branches of the United States Postal Service (USPS). This, despite the fact that the general public uses its services less than they used to, what with paying bills online and the convenience of shipping options with other companies such as UPS and FedEx.

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NRA’s faulty marketing

If You Ask Me

The NRA wants me. There must be some mistake.
Actually, there’s more than one mistake in the letter the National Rifle Association sent the other day, inviting me to become a member for $25, a $10 saving if I act now. If I joined and signed “the enclosed National Petition to Protect Our Right to Keep and Bear Arms,” I’d also get a free duffel bag, embossed in gold with the initials NRA.
The letter to me is billed as a “Connecticut Gun Owner Priority Communication,” but I am not now and never have been a Connecticut gun owner or a gun owner anywhere else.

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