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Opinion/Viewpoint

In this new column, we will explore the ways that hobbies (especially ones that connect the head and the hands) can offer serenity and a healthy sense of accomplishment. Our first featured pair of hands belongs to The Lakeville Journal’s own Patrick L. Sullivan, who not only covers town events but also writes our popular fly-fishing column, Tangled Lines.

For Patrick, fishing is a source of solace and a respite from the stresses of his job. It’s an activity that’s almost completely silent, except for the sound of the water and the light whizz of his fishing line....

The Lakeville Journal Opinion/Viewpoint

Praise given to modern medicine

It was five years ago and after a long and intensive surgery. The surgeon approached me to tell me that the result of the biopsy of the tumor between my vertebrates was, indeed, multiple myeloma. Since I had never heard that term, I innocently asked him if that was a form of cancer. “Yes it is,” he responded and with an assuring smile he added, “Don’t worry. This is a type of cancer that has been extensively researched and there are many treatments available, and I will assure you that you will live a long and healthy life.”

Partisan debate on guns lacks clarity and honesty

Protesting President Trump’s massacre condolence tour when it reached Dayton last week, a man held a sign reading, “You are why.” But as objectionable as the president’s demeanor often is, the protester’s sign was just politically partisan wishful thinking.

Photo Op

Not in your backyard. How about theirs?

In 1598, when a theater was being built in London for William Shakespeare’s acting troupe, local residents figured theater-goers would disrupt the neighborhood so they blocked construction. The Globe Theater ended up being built across the Thames.

More recently, Falls Village, Goshen and Salisbury have all rejected affordable housing in areas that residents deemed too sensitive, too idyllic or too inappropriate for such use. New sites will have to be acquired or the projects cancelled.

Turning Back The Pages

100 years ago — August 1919

Nicholas Guzman, a full blood Filipino, is one of the workmen employed by Barnes and Osborn on the state road work. Nicholas speaks good English, has been in this country eight years and wants to locate in Lakeville as he likes it better here than any place he has visited yet.

 

LIME ROCK — Mr. Duncan who has been ill, is now able to be out and is soon to return to his duties.

 

SHARON — The H.B. Dakin Co. have improved their store with a new dress of paint.

Medicare for all, or Afghanistan for all?

Government is good at two things: waging stupid wars and distributing money. This should be examined closely in light of the clamor from Democrats for “Medicare for all.”

For to govern is to choose, and as the new Democratic U.S. representative from New York City, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, has observed, nobody ever asks where the money for another stupid war is to come from, and Afghanistan has consumed hundreds of billions of dollars over 18 years. 

Death penalty to make a comeback

States don’t execute very many people these days, so the Trump Administration intends to take up the slack by reviving the death penalty on the federal level for the first time in nearly two decades.

Given the president’s love for things as they used to be, it’s not surprising.

Rethinking 'asylum seekers' and 'refugees'

The Guatemalans, Hondurans and Salvadorans fleeing the violence, unemployment and poverty of their homelands (which constitute the Northern Triangle of Central American nations) have largely followed the strategies of their Mexican neighbors. Since 1965, the United States has capped the number of annual immigrants from the Western Hemisphere at 120,000. On the assumption that this meager number would never accommodate their entry, migrants slipped in somewhere along our nearly 2000-mile southern border, agreeing to live in the economic and political shadows. 

Our Home, Our Future: The White Hart

Everyone in Salisbury is delighted that managers Dan Winkley and John Ciliberto have been able to restore The White Hart inn to its traditional role as a lively hub in the center of town. 

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We’re 123 years old, yet new every week

This week marks the beginning of the new year for The Lakeville Journal’s life as a publication, entering its 123rd year, having begun publication in 1897. If you would like to stop by our office in Falls Village, you can see a hard copy that is kept under glass of Vol. 1, No. 1, published Aug. 14, 1897, four broadsheet pages of news.