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Photographer Lans Christensen spotted this pair of deer on Kent’s Cobble Road in the mist on Saturday morning, Oct. 5. He noted the new antlers on the head of the buck and said that these young males are sometimes called  “pretzel heads,”which is a reference to their “compact new rack.”Deer hunting season in Connecticut began in mid September and continues until the end of December. Hunters are required to wear fluorescent orange garments; hikers are advised to do the same.

Kent

Making Kent a better place to live, one pie at a time

KENT — A “frenzy of activity” is how Virginia Bush Suttman described the public opening of Kent Affordable Housing’s (KAH) Makers and Bakers Market on Saturday morning, Nov. 3, at St. Andrew’s parish hall in Kent. 
The prior evening, Friday, Nov. 2, featured a gala preview party where craft beers and wine flowed freely and an assortment of homemade and Kent-made food products were enjoyed by about 50 attendees.

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On the fast track to the altar

KENT — At the awards ceremony for the 42nd annual Kent Pumpkin Run on Sunday, Oct. 28, Matt Monroe took the opportunity to propose to his love, Kendall Lyons. She said, “Yes!” Not even her second-place finish among the women racers could match that moment. The cheers for them were the most excited of the day. It’ll be hard to beat that  in Pumpkin Run no. 43 … but who knows?
For a full report on the race and more photos, turn to Page A8.

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Kent becomes Stars Hollow once again

KENT — Kent once again morphed into the fictional town of Stars Hollow, home to the extraordinary “Gilmore Girls,” on Oct. 19 and 20. 
The occasion was the third Gilmore Girls Fan Fest. “Fan” hardly describes the passionately devoted followers of this television show, which ran from 2000 to 2007. Kent was aswarm with fest attendees — almost entirely women, from near and far, and of all ages. Though their numbers were large, they were almost all in small clusters of three or four, moving about town and the shops, and the fest venues.

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LaFontan and Purdy wed in Kent

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Huffing and chugging at CAMA

KENT — The three-day Fall Festival of the Connecticut Antique Machinery Association, Sept. 28 to 30, in Kent was blessed with autumn’s finest weather — and crowds that exceeded all estimates. 
The parked cars in the fields below stretched on seemingly endlessly. Happily, there were two tractors with wagons shuttling visitors back and forth from cars to fair. 

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Power plant concerns addressed by DEEP in Kent

KENT—Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) officials addressed a crowd of about 75 residents from Kent and surrounding towns regarding Cricket Valley Energy Center (CVEC) in a meeting at Kent Town Hall on Wednesday, Sept. 26.
 The meeting was convened by the recently formed citizen’s action group Western Connecticut Clean Air Action (WCCAA), comprised of individuals who are concerned about the power plant’s potential impact on regional air quality.

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Smoke in the air

Visitors to the Connecticut Antique Machinery Association’s Fall Festival in Kent, Sept. 28 to 30, viewed operating traction engines, locomotives, gasoline-powered tractors and more. One young enthusiast tried his hand at a (non-operating) power shovel. Story, more photos, Huffing and chugging at CAMA.

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All the comforts of home at church fair

KENT — This year’s Autumn Fest at Kent’s First Congregational Church was highlighted by a lavish display of quilts in the church sanctuary.  
More than 40 quilts, crafted by the church community, exemplified the creativity and craftsmanship of this art form. 
A good example was Nancy Brown’s quilt, “Attic Windows,” picturing a deer viewed from inside a home. 

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Kindling a love for ceramic arts with Clay Way

KENT — You needn’t be an art aficionado to enjoy the self-guided Clay Way 2018 Studio Tour on Oct. 6, 7 and 8. Organizers say the 14 potters (who will be located at nine different locations in Kent and surrounding towns) are opening their studios to those who want to buy, browse or simply enjoy refreshments and chat with the artists about their clay creations.

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Kent potter’s body of work bridges disciplines, cultures

KENT — Every 10 minutes, for 40 hours straight, they feed the fiery beast. 
Once a year, in alternating shifts, experienced potters, apprentices and friends from the Northwest Corner come together to feed wood into the blazing belly of the sprawling brickanagama at Joy Brown’s South Kent pottery studio. The Japanese-style kiln contains about 200 sculptural and figural pieces of all shapes and sizes painstakingly crafted by Brown and other potters who are participating in the annual Clay Way Studio Tour over Columbus Day weekend.

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