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Kent

KENT — Every 10 minutes, for 40 hours straight, they feed the fiery beast. 

Once a year, in alternating shifts, experienced potters, apprentices and friends from the Northwest Corner come together to feed wood into the blazing belly of the sprawling brickanagama at Joy Brown’s South Kent pottery studio. The Japanese-style kiln contains about 200 sculptural and figural pieces of all shapes and sizes painstakingly crafted by Brown and other potters who are participating in the annual Clay Way Studio Tour over Columbus Day weekend.

It took the close-...

Kent

Hats tossed, some stovepipe style, at Lincoln Day dinner

KENT — The political season opened at the Bull’s Bridge Inn in Kent on Sunday evening, Feb. 11, with candidates for statewide offices making appearances at the Kent Republican Town Committee’s annual Lincoln Day dinner.
The candidates for U.S. Senate, governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of the state and treasurer had two minutes to speak — three if they were willing to wear the Lincoln-esque stovepipe hat. The time limit was enforced (with a smile) by moderator Vince LaFontan.

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Lincoln’s Birthday dinner planned for Sunday

KENT — Lincoln’s Birthday will be celebrated at Kent’s Bull’s Bridge Inn on Sunday, Feb. 11, under the auspices of the Kent Republican Town Committee.
The evening will begin at 6:30 p.m. with hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar, followed by dinner at 7 p.m. Choices for the meal are New York strip steak, chicken Marsala or grilled salmon, plus dessert and coffee or tea. The cost is $30 per person or $55 per couple, tax and tip included.

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Walking one step at a time, living life one day at a time

KENT — Located only about a mile from the Appalachian Trail (AT), Kent has long been a favorite stop for
thru-hikers. In 2015 Sam Ducharme was one of those many intrepid adventurers to stop in the town on his journey from Georgia to Maine. 
In a talk sponsored by the Kent Memorial Library on Saturday, Jan. 20, at Town Hall, Ducharme shared his experiences about the six months it took him to hike the 2,200-mile long trail.

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The ice will stick around for a while

 KENT — Ice remains largely intact on the Housatonic River in Kent more than two weeks after an ice jam caused flooding on roadways and properties.
Warmer air temperatures and rain on Tuesday, Jan. 23, caused the north end of the 2-mile-long jam to erode 1,300 feet. 
“This is good news,” said state Rep. Brian Ohler (R-64), who has been in town to help deal with the situation.

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Annual town meeting sums up a year of Kent events

KENT — The centuries-old tradition of the annual town meeting was continued on Thursday, Jan. 18, when a modest crowd gathered at Kent Town Hall.
The agenda was straightforward, and the meeting lasted about 25 minutes.
In a routine annual authorization, voters were asked to give the Board of Selectmen and the treasurer permission to borrow from time to time and upon the credit of the town funds for the needs of the town. All in attendance unanimously approved.  

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Ice jams and state spending caps

KENT — The Board of Finance in Kent met on Tuesday, Jan. 16. It was the first meeting since the municipal election in November 2017. Mark Sebetic was elected chairman and Jim Blackketter was elected vice chairman.
First Selectman Bruce Adams gave the board an update on the flooding in town created by a one-mile ice jam on the Housatonic River that caused the water level to rapidly rise, affecting roadways and properties.
“We’ve got a great team of people working together to manage the situation,” said Adams. 

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‘This is what democracy looks like’

KENT — On the one-year anniversary of both the inauguration of President Donald Trump and the million-strong Washington women’s march, Kent celebrated with its own Women’s March, as did towns and cities nationwide. 
Marchers slowly gathered at Kent Town Hall on Saturday morning, many carrying signs indicating their sentiments about  many issues, both personal and political.

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We protest

Protesters of all ages turned out Saturday in Kent, above, Salisbury and other area towns to express their feelings about a variety of issues. Stories, more photos, Women, men and children rose to protest on Saturday and ‘This is what democracy looks like’.

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The drone photos of the river

The photos below and on Page A9were taken by a drone on Saturday, Jan. 13, for the town of Kent by Xiaoye  “Able” Zhou, a student in the class of 2018 at the Marvelwood School in Kent.  
“Able was asked to  pilot his drone to help emergency management and Kent Volunteer Fire Department officials monitor the ice dam situations,” according to Marvelwood teacher Laurie Doss. 

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Water, flowing again, is expected to break ice jam

KENT — Warm air temperatures and flood-stage water levels in the Housatonic River were expected to break up the ice jams that have blocked the river in Kent for the past week. 
As of press time on Tuesday, the surface of the water was still mostly covered with frozen chunks of ice. Despite flood warnings for Litchfield County, the water level of the river in Kent had dropped 50 inches by Monday.

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