Login

Kent

KENT — Every 10 minutes, for 40 hours straight, they feed the fiery beast. 

Once a year, in alternating shifts, experienced potters, apprentices and friends from the Northwest Corner come together to feed wood into the blazing belly of the sprawling brickanagama at Joy Brown’s South Kent pottery studio. The Japanese-style kiln contains about 200 sculptural and figural pieces of all shapes and sizes painstakingly crafted by Brown and other potters who are participating in the annual Clay Way Studio Tour over Columbus Day weekend.

It took the close-...

Kent

Princesses for a day

KENT — If they could make a wish, most little girls would probably ask to be a princess from a favorite cartoon film. That wish was granted on Saturday, April 15, at the Marvelwood School on Skiff Mountain in Kent, which hosted its annual Princess Tea Party for the Make-a-Wish Foundation.
About $800 was raised for the foundation and the families it helps out across the country. In the four years the school has hosted the popular event, more than $4,500 has been raised. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Bear Watch

SOUTH KENT — John Mauer and his wife, Laura, were visited by a large black bear at their home in South Kent at just around dinnertime on Sunday, April 16. 
“He circled our house trying every door, then went north to the next home. When he got there, he ate the food on a picnic table and headed north again to the next farmhouse.”
In the recent past, most bears have limited themselves to just eating bird seed when they can get at it. This particular bear seemed to be hungrier and more aggressive. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Inspired by haunted house

KENT — Author Elinor Lipman was inspired by a haunted house to write her latest novel, “On Turpentine Lane.” She talked about the book and signed copies of it at the House of Books on Saturday, April 15 .
A native of Lowell, Mass., Lipman began her writing career as a college intern with the Lowell Sun newspaper. Her first book, “Into Love and Out Again,” was published in 1987. The publication of her second book, “Then She Found Me,” followed in 1990, and was eventually made into a motion picture.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Save the bees, if you please

KENT — For the past six years the Kent Conservation Commission, in an effort to spread environmentally themed education and awareness, has been co-sponsoring lectures in the children’s room of the Kent Memorial Library. 
While past speakers touched on topics such as recycling and renewable resources, the invitation to speaker Catherine Wolko of the Humble Bee Honey Company in Watertown, Conn., was particularly relevant this year. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Effort to protect waterfront

KENT — The meeting of the Board of Selectmen on Friday, April 7, was well attended by residents who came out to voice their opinions on the proposed installation of lockable gates on North Kent Road and River Road. 
The gates were introduced as a potential solution to combat the sometimes rowdy and often messy gatherings along the Housatonic River last summer.
As many as 300 people at a time came to enjoy the sun and water on either bank of the Housatonic River during the summer of 2016, according to First Selectman Bruce Adams. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Kent is on the map with its own app

KENT — The primary goal of the Kent Chamber of Commerce is to promote the town. New President Tim Good has figured out an ingenius way to will help achieve that aim, with an app that he hopes will put Kent on the map. 
The app, called KentCT, was developed in conjunction with Rural Intelligence, an online publication that covers the Tri-state area. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Finding treasures at annual egg hunt

KENT — Despite the morning chill, turnout was good for the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 8, at Town Hall. 
Two hunts were held. The first was on the front lawn for younger tykes, up to age 5; the second was on the back lawn for ages 6 to 10. 
Bundled up in coats and hats, the children waited in anticipation at the starting line, scoping out the prizes to be found. 
“The town has been doing the annual Easter Egg Hunt for well over 20 years,” said Lesly Ferris, director of Parks and Recreation. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Determining what success looks like at KCS

KENT — The regular Board of Education meeting at Kent Center School (KCS) on Wednesday, April 5, was brief.
Three students from KCS who participated in the Invention Convention, a competition designed to promote critical thinking and problem solving, will be moving on to the finals at the state level. One sixth-grade student who invented a cell phone projector has even applied for a U.S. patent.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

KCS students met the meaty mind behind ‘Meatballs’

KENT — Among  the second-graders of Kent Center School there is a rite of passage and a marker of the start of spring: Judi Barrett Day. 
The children’s book author, who splits her time between Brooklyn, N.Y., and Kent, has made a holiday of her annual visit to the second-grade class, an anniversary that stretches back more than 15 years. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

How to share precious resources (such as volunteers and equipment)

KENT — It was a summit meeting, the first of its kind ever held in Kent and though it wasn’t the G8, you could call it the NP37. Attending were representatives of the 37 different nonprofit entities that coexist here (in a town with a population of about 2,960 people, many of whom are part-time residents). That’s right: 37 nonprofits servicing the needs of fewer than 3,000 people.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.