Login

Books

Marijuana Book Leaves More Questions Than Answers

Books

Alex Berenson is a former reporter for The New York Times, for which he covered subjects ranging from Iraq to Hurricane Katrina to the drug industry. His newest book, “Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence,” is the culmination of his conclusions on the latter, contextualized with research pulled from multiple disciplines. But while his research seems thorough, and he has clearly made up his own mind, the book itself leaves a lot to be desired for such a controversial topic.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Curating The Land

Books: ‘Garden Wild’

Rich people (and wannabes) — take note — a landscaping revolution is underway. It is time to reconsider those shocking pink azaleas and blindingly green Zoysia lawns that seemed so right when you were building your first Mc Mansion. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Schwartz Discusses ‘Red Daughter’ at The White Hart May 21

Books

The White Hart Speakers Series in conjunction with Oblong Books and the Scoville Memorial Library will present Jonathan Burnham Schwartz reading from his new book “The Red Daughter,” a sweeping historical novel and unexpected love story inspired by the remarkable life of Svetlana Alliluyeva, the only daughter of Joseph Stalin.  Novelist John Burnham Schwartz’s father was the young lawyer who escorted Alliluyeva to the United States after she defected in 1967. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Passion, Exile, A Father Who’s A Horrific Murderer

Books: ‘The Red Daughter’

I was first introduced to John Burnham Schwartz’s writing 20 years ago when he published the harrowing and beautifully written Reservation Road. It is a woven personal history, told through the eyes of a variety of characters, and centered around the tragic death of child. So, when I was asked to review his new novel, “The Red Daughter,” I was thrilled to find myself back in his narrative world, which has only gained power. I read this novel in two sittings, interrupted only once by a brief phone call from my daughter on Mother’s Day. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

When Trust Confuses Teens

Books

Sarah and David, the teenage protagonists of Susan Choi’s new novel “Trust Exercise,” have the kind of tumultuous connection that begs recognition, even when they are trying to avoid it themselves. Their unpredictable acting teacher Mr. Kingsley delights in bringing that tension to the forefront of his classes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Syrian Cookbook Builds Bridges

Books

Bridges are good things, higher and longer than walls. Bridges bring journeys to mind; walls don’t.
“The Bread and Salt Between Us” by Mayada Anjari provides a true bridge experience, bringing the reader and cook into communion with not only authentic Syrian recipes, but also the Syrian family, Mayada and Ahmad Anjari, who abandoned their battle-ravaged home town in Syria, to walk with their children over countless nights through the desert to the safety of Jordan. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Travel to Greece To Learn the Etymology of English

Books: ‘Greek To Me: Adventures Of The Comma Queen’

Mary Norris’s new book, “Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen,” takes readers on a personal voyage across the wine-dark seas of Greek history, mythology, geography and especially etymology, a word that derives from the Greek ἐτυµολογία (etumología), itself from ἔτυµον (étumon), meaning “true sense,” and the suffix -logia, denoting “the study of.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Power, Sex And Regret

Books: ‘You Know You Want This’

The phrase “going viral” is so ubiquitous it has almost lost any sense of drama.  Originally the phrase described the unprecedented phenomenon of an innocuous piece of internet-based media that was so widely viewed that it became, however briefly, a cultural touchstone. Warhol’s dictum that every person would have their own 15 minutes of fame can now apply to video recordings that are less than 15 seconds long. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

When The Model Became The Artist

Books: ‘The Age Of Light’

Women and art have always had a bad relationship. No, let’s rephrase that. Art, as pulled from sewage of common life, singled out from history’s clutter, buffed, shined and hung for all to see as exemplary, yes, that kind of art, has rarely considered the work of women. As a 1989 screen print by the anonymous female artist collective Guerrilla Girls famously stated of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, “Less than 5% of artists in the Modern Arts Sections are women, but 85% of the nudes are female.”

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Religious Intolerance In Old Lakeville

Book: ‘Lakeville Crucifix: A Religious War in 19th Century Connecticut’

Divisiveness is as old as the hills.
If you think the present political climate is tense wherever people are still willing to speak to one another, it wasn’t so different in late 19th century Lakeville. 
In a recently published, thoroughly researched book, “Lake-ville Crucifix: A Religious War in 19th Century Connecticut,” local author Geoffrey Brown explores the genesis of religious intolerance, suspicion of immigrants, and divided politics.  

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.