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Art

Art and Technology Merge in Photo Show

leong@lakevillejournal.com

Maurine Sutter’s photographs of peonies, hand colored with archival pigments on acid-free paper, will hang in Salisbury’s Chaiwalla just until May 31. These are moody, arty (in the best sense) pictures that often resemble delicate, detailed watercolors. The pink blossoms, and Sutter presents only old-fashioned, pale pink flowers here, rise into the air or lie on the ground under their own spectacular weight.

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Documenting a Ghastly Disregard

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Superfund, that 1980 Congressional creation empowered to declare and then remediate toxic environmental sites throughout the United States, is seldom mentioned these days. Few of us remember that work continues on the Upper Hudson River near Hudson Falls and Troy, NY, where General Electric discharged thousands of pounds of PCBs that killed fish and contaminated the river all the way downstream to New York City.

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Photography for Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Sohn Fine Art is a small, white-walled gallery on Elm Street in Stockbridge, MA, just around the north corner from the Red Lion Inn. Owner Cassandra Sohn — blonde, beautiful, frighteningly well organized — opened last year, but she has already built an interesting and varied roster of photographers.
Now in her first Community Arts Exhibition, Sohn has chosen work from 19 photographers — all students or supporters of IS183 Art School of the Berkshires, where she teaches. There are some very good, even extraordinary, photographs on display, and a percentage of all sales goes to IS183.

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Making Art, All Kinds of Art

The Art Scene

Michael Quadland seems to be a man too accomplished to be true: With a Ph.D. in psychology from New York University and a masters in public health from Yale, Quadland worked with AIDS patients in New York City until — after years of losing patients and friends — he left the city for private practice in Connecticut. He restored an 18th-century farmhouse in Sherman, largely by hand, then decided to begin writing.
Quadland, now in his mid-60s, published his first novel, “That Was Then,” in 2007 and his second, “Offspring,” earlier this year. But he also began to paint.

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Of Bees, a Rabbit And a Slice of Pizza

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Irene Blagden makes art from observing nature and nature’s creatures. Her work in a variety of mediums can be as spare as Japanese ink paintings, realistically detailed, or whimsical, even cartoony.
Randy Orzano’s art is all about the honeybees that are both his collaborators and subjects. Their divergent explorations of nature are on exhibition at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon.

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Art in Salisbury

compass@lakevillejournal.com

In a tribute to photographer Bill Binzen, who died in 2010, his fellow artists, 14 of them, have mounted a beautiful exhibit at Salisbury School’s Tremaine Gallery. The work is varied, taking in Joseph Meehan’s frigid and mighty snowscapes; Jonathan Doster’s atmospheric images from Burma; a cheetah in a tree attributed to Dan Mead and Sally Eagle who shoot together; Tom Zetterstrom’s afflicted trees; and gorgeously abstracted waterscapes by George Shattuck.

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Making Images, Not Jargon

Excursions: Cindy Sherman at MoMA
leong@lakevillejournal.com

The Museum of Modern Art’s massive, exciting, yet oddly curated survey of photographer Cindy Sherman’s work since 1980, when she invaded the New York art scene with the 69 pictures in “Untitled Movie Stills,” is graphic evidence of why this small, blonde woman, working alone in her studio, has altered the progress of art photography throughout the world.
Photography, once a documentary medium, has expanded to include staged design controlled by the photographer. And no one stages or controls her images like Cindy Sherman.

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Childhood in Sun And Shadow

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

James Meyer’s art is about the 1960s childhood he remembers from growing up on Long Island. It is filled with sun and shadow, innocence and menace. His suburbia is a world of false promises and unfulfilled dreams, a redoubt against the world outside and the dangers of growing up.

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Art in Salisbury

James Meyer installed his playful images in watercolor, aluminum, and mylar earlier this week for the opening of Rock, Paper, Scissors at The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery, through April 22. For information, call 860-435-2591.

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Of Moods And Seasons

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Robert Kipniss, a part-time resident of Sharon, is a painter of trees and leaves and ghostly landscapes. And like the artist himself, the pictures are controlled, masterful, often haunting and even (unlike the artist) a bit menacing. His trees can seem about to deconstruct, his leaves to fly away.
Now 11 of the artist’s new works — most are from 2011 — are on exhibit at Franklin Riehlman Fine Art in New York City.

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