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Art

Art With a Story

Art Scene

Fran Gormley is awesome. After growing up poor, her family often on welfare, she clawed her way into a scholarship at Fairleigh Dickenson University, graduated summa cum laude, earned a master’s degree in social psychology, then began a career in advertising and marketing. Later she founded her own brand management company, sold it, and then had the resources to pursue her hobby, photography, with a vengeance.
But not just ordinary photography or everyday fine art photography. Aerial photography.

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Imaginative, Experimental And Fascinating

The Art Scene

If you saw Henry Klimowicz’s work at The Hotchkiss Tremaine Gallery in early 2012, prepare to be surprised. The sculptor’s new show, which opens at The Morrison Gallery in Kent July 20, this Saturday, is a dramatic, mesmerizing exhibition of the artist’s growing confidence, expanding imagination and continuing experimentation.

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A Showy Start for Bard’s SummerScape

The Arts Scene

Bard’s SummerScape 2013 opened this month with a reimagined retrospective of “The Rite of Spring,” done as a performance piece combining dance — the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company — and theater ­— the SITI Company (Saratogi International Theater Institute) — both in residence at the college.

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A Building For Music, Dance, Theater, Film And Ideas

The Arts Scene

Having passed its first decade this year, the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts stands without equal in the Tri-state region. The building at Bard College in Red Hook, NY, designed by architect Frank Gehry, is the only modern, purpose-built structure in our area famed as much for its appearance as for what goes on inside it.

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Clams, Eggs and a Knowing Owl

The Art Scene

Hidden under The Wish House in West Cornwall, CT, the Souterrain Gallery is hosting a remarkable photography show from Catherine Noren and Lazlo Gyorsok.
Both Noren and Gyorsok are well known in the area. As a couple, their photography interests differ widely: He strives for drama, she for directness often mixed with surprise. Sometimes they cross into each other’s territory.

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One Century to the Next

Jane Eckert’s gallery in Millerton, NY, has two exhibits together: One from the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the other from the second half of the 20th century. And it works, probably because the pieces are so good.

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Giving Works of Art A Little Distance

The Art Scene

What a difference venues make. Two art shows now hanging in Sharon prove the point.
Robert Pittenger’s paintings at the Sharon Historical Society need space and distance between them and the viewer of these difficult works. Up close his rough undersurfaces, rolled on thickly, look like stucco; and his trees, houses and land can seem amateurish. But move back, look from farther away, and the best paintings come together in a rigorous whole.

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Art Scene

Alex Krauss, 24, is a street photographer, catching people as they take in life around them, mostly in black and white and all on film.
Here, a New Yorker sights the perfect image of actress Keira Knightley — cool, removed, artificial — as he goes about his regular, real-life day.
A number of Krauss’s images are on display at Chaiwalla in Salisbury: Little boys admiring a battleship, abstract street shapes, signs. It’s interesting to see images of ordinary life carefully observed. The show runs through the end of June. For information, call 860-435-9758.

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How Walt Disney Made “Snow White”

The Art Scene

A small woman, fragile, wearing riding boots, a smart little jacket and large, Dior-framed spectacles turned to someone nearby, also waiting in the rain outside the Norman Rockwell Museum last week.
“I’m Marge Champion,” she said cheerfully. “Hello.”
And so she was. Two inches shorter than when she met her dancing partner, Gower Champion, “I’ve shrunk,” she says, but as ready as ever to take the stage. Marge Champion, all five feet of her, was here in Stockbridge, MA, to open a show at the Rockwell museum on Walt Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.”
Yes.

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Dunlop Looks Deeper Into Urban Life

The Art Scene

David Dunlop is a painter’s painter and a teacher of painting, so it is not surprising that his current show at The White Gallery, “Return to Gotham,” is both beautiful and a lesson in technique.
Dunlop left the city long ago for the Northwest Corner, where he painted landscapes. The city remained an occasional subject, mostly crowded Grand Central Terminal pictures, until his son, Max, also a painter, suggested they make art together. And specifically that they paint city scenes.

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