Login

Art

Two Artists, Two Views

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

When Sharon library’s art mavens chose Patty Mullins and Lilly Woodruff for a two-person show, they selected painters who differ in subjects and techniques. One paints mysterious, often brooding pictures; the other lays on thick vertical or horizontal slashes of paint or, more abstractly, wide ribbons of unexpected colors to create her landscapes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Taking Photography And Ideas for Photography . . . Into Strange Totally New Worlds

karenb@lakevillejournal.com

A study of an ordinary object is not a new idea, but it still works — very well in James Boeding’s “Book Play,” a photographic exhibit at Lady Audrey’s Gallery in Millerton, NY.
In its own right, the display is mesmerizing; a wall-filling grid of 13 matted photographs resembling little windows, each revealing a graphic, boldly-colored scene. Boeding credits local printer Berkshire Digital Studio for giving his prints, limited to 25 each, professional pizazz.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

The White Gallery Reopens With an Old Favorite

The Art Scene

Exhibiting three quite different landscape painters in a single, open space is a daunting challenge. Yet that is what Tino Galluzzo has chosen to do for the first show in his new – and newly renovated – White Gallery located behind the original White, which is now home to Gallery Arts Guild. Agitated work by David Dunlop, a White favorite, is hung near the calm, intricate oils of Carolyn Edlund and the simple, emphatically horizontal pictures of Victor Leger.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Women Painters at Eckert

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

A chance meeting with art historian Judith Kafka Maxwell introduced Jane Eckert to the work of Anna Richards Brewster and eventually led to the dual show of women artists now in Eckert’s gallery in Millerton: A lovely group of Brewster’s paintings from the early 20th century hang in Eckert’s front room, while contemporary works by nine other women occupy the rear space.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Glass, Water and Whispers

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Judith Singelis has a superb eye for contemporary art. Within the space limits of her Argazzi Gallery, she shows work that can surprise and delight. On exhibit, now, are paintings and glass pieces from three women whose work is very different but all very fine.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

From Strange To Very Good

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Jane Strong and John Brett opened Gallery Arts Guild in Lakeville to showcase the work of emerging artists and artisans in the area. Their first exhibit is a mixed bag. Some of the work is good and some not. Even from the same artist, quality can vary surprisingly.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Art in Millerton

compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s a barn with an ancient, rusty thermometer outside and a weedy path to the door. On the outside. On the inside, though, it is an art gallery featuring the work of three artists in a show titled Photos of Things Next to Me. One of the artists, Jeff Barnett-Winsby, “shoots what you see from a train, the backyard of America,” gallery organizer Henry Klimowicz says. The images are lean and a little too clean. Greg Lock “makes very 21st-century photos,” Klimowicz says, one of them a barn in various stages of con- and de- struction.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Sculpted Shapes in Steel, Stone, Even Straw

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

From a distance, it seems to be a family dressed for Sunday visiting: Grandma sits on a bench wearing a sunhat, red cardigan, white sneakers; a man has one foot on the bench as he ties his shoe, a straw dog – literally – beside him; and an obviously younger woman — she’s dressed in more youthful clothes — holds a little girl’s hand while a young boy runs toward the old woman. But this family in the middle of a lawn at Noble Horizons is made of sticks and string and hay, Michael Melle’s contribution to the expansive outdoor invitational sculpture show on the Noble campus.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Tattooing The Joys And Sorrows Of Life

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

I fell in love with Bill Wykoff when I was 8. He smoked Lucky Strikes, taught me to play gin rummy and kept a German Luger automatic pistol he’d brought home from the war in a drawer of his roll-top desk. Also, he had a tattoo, a massive one on his chest and shoulder with an eagle and snakes and a great rippling flag.
Then my mother dropped him, and I never saw him again.
But the memory lingers on. That was one terrific tattoo.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Collaborations With Nature

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

A shaggy Sicilian donkey protects Randy Orzano’s sheep from coyotes and other predators that roam open country at the edges of Sharon, CT. That donkey knows its job, largely by intuition. Anything outside the fence is a danger, so when a lamb wandered beyond the pale, the donkey killed it.
Animals know their job here, untuitively. The donkey protects the sheep that crop the grassy fields, the bees keep their hives, make honey and maybe even collaborate with Orzano — a civil engineer by training; an artist, by desire.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.