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Art

Modern Masters

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

They are India ink on paper, this suite of seven abstract and deconstructed female nudes, and they may be the most compelling pictures in Billy Morrison’s new show of works from Hans Hoffman and Alexander Liberman. These busy, flat images by Hoffman prefigure
Willem de Kooning’s third “Woman” series of paintings that were among the jewels in the Museum of Modern Art’s de Kooning retrospective last fall.

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Combining Movies, Food and Art

compass@lakevillejournal.com

A long time ago, somebody figured out that food and movies go together. So when Janet Crawshaw, associate publisher of The Valley Table, a magazine devoted to all things edible in New York’s Hudson Valley, announced that the sixth annual restaurant week would include four new restaurants in the northeastern part of the valley, Bob and Carol Sadlon got an idea.

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Strange, Compelling Art

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Barry Kieselstein-Cord once sat atop a kingdom built on his simple yet dramatic jewelry — concha belts, odd heavy bracelets and necklaces and pendants — unlike any in the upscale, non-precious stone market of the early 1980s. His pieces were carried by Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman, where his first shop-in-shop eventually led to freestanding stores in a dozen international cities. He won two Coty awards and was among the most influential designers in America. Then it all went south.

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A Painter Looks At Walmart, And Us

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

In the center of The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery someone has parked a shopping cart, the kind we push around grocery stores, except this one belongs to Walmart and is placed to dramatize the link between art and big-store commerce — the art being Brendan O’Connell’s bold, hectic canvases painted from (mostly) his photographs of Walmart.

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Leaving In, Also Leaving Out

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Susan Ferrari Rowley’s sculpture is about opposites and paradoxes: yielding and unyielding materials, volume and its absence, light and shadow. Pieces seem almost weightless, fragile; yet they occupy large spaces. They are difficult at first, peculiar, almost too simple. But quickly you discover their complexity: What is absent is as important as what is there in Rowley’s glowing pieces.

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Small and Telling

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Ann E. Coulter, the Illinois-based artist who Judith Singelis first brought to Argazzi Gallery several years ago, is back in Lakeville with a stunning show of her pastels. This time, however, the work is small and delicate rather than large, and it asks the viewer to come close and reflect, to consider time and nature, the past and perhaps the present.
Coulter is a master of place and mood, trees and leaves, light and shadow. Her drawings describe places and times that paradoxically seem timeless, and she hints at the changed way we perceive nature in the contemporary world.

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Painting Big Ideas

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s called crowd sourcing, Brendan O’Connell says. When a company or, say, a government has a problem, it broadens the search and asks the public for help.
This painter says he is doing something like that.

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Words & Drawings

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Who knew cartooning was such hard work? Peter Steiner and three cartoonist friends, all regular contributors to The New Yorker, made clear just how hard it is last Sunday in a lively, interesting and entertaining Sharon Town Hall presentation that preceded the opening of a delightful exhibition of their work at Sharon Library.

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Surprises at Noble Show

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Noble Horizons’ 40th Invitational Art Show is quite strong, perhaps because the nine artists exhibiting were limited to only a few pieces, which have been hung in congenial and complementary groupings.

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Too Old To Share

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

If you want to feel really old and out of touch, by all means visit “Thanks For Sharing,” the new visual show at the Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery. Perhaps you, too, will wander through the mercifully small show looking for something familiar, something you understand, something to glom on to. Good luck.

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