Login

Art

Dunlop Looks Deeper Into Urban Life

The Art Scene

David Dunlop is a painter’s painter and a teacher of painting, so it is not surprising that his current show at The White Gallery, “Return to Gotham,” is both beautiful and a lesson in technique.
Dunlop left the city long ago for the Northwest Corner, where he painted landscapes. The city remained an occasional subject, mostly crowded Grand Central Terminal pictures, until his son, Max, also a painter, suggested they make art together. And specifically that they paint city scenes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A Sure Eye for Texture, Beauty and Tone

The Art Scene

Argazzi Art’s summer show is an exciting mix of minimalist, conceptual, gestural and mixed media pieces.
Gathering work from five women and hanging their pictures with her usual deliberate brilliance, gallery owner Judith Singelis again proves that she has a sure eye.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

A View of Gorgeous, Relentless Deterioration

The Art Scene

Avery Danziger’s new show of photographs at The Hotchkiss Tremaine Gallery is an enlarged, grander version of his stunning show last November at The White Gallery. Some images of the Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center in Wingdale, NY, are framed, as they were earlier, but others have been enlarged or printed on cloth to dramatic effect.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Of Time and Neglect and Art

The Art Scene

Avery Danziger is drawn to excess (an observation he seems to like). Take his photographs of a shuttered psychiatric hospital with its peeling, molding, rusting planes, its bone-deep ruin, its pencilled note to no one there. Not for 19 years.
The rambling Harlem Valley Psychiatric Center in Wingdale, NY, closed in 1994, has given up to neglect and the chaos that follows. But Danziger’s images of the walls, the plumbing, the pools of still red water on the floor, the decay are stunning.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Expressing the Unsaid

The Art Scene

Long ago I taught mostly Mexican-American high school students in San Antonio, Texas. With reading levels stuck around seventh or eighth grade, they were bored by history and English classes. But after my first year I learned what they liked and were good at: art.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Minimal Work That Conveys Great Substance

 
Leon Graham reviews Sam Posey’s recent paintings of women, on exhibit at Ober Gallery 
 
Click here for story and another photo.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Minimal Work That Conveys Great Substance

The Art Scene

 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

And Elsewhere in the Art World . . .

Works by New Hartford resident Bryan Nash Gill — tree sections and relief prints from them — are on view at The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery through May 5. For information, call 860-435-3663.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Out of the Art House, Into the Movie House

Art Scene

This first in a series of documentaries, “Exhibition: Manet: Portraying Life,” brings major current museum exhibits to the big screen. 
This inaugural film takes moviegoers to the Royal Academy of Arts in London for a show of portraits by French 19th-century painter Edouard Manet.
Directors Phil Grabsky and Ben Harding have recruited “art historian and TV broadcaster” Tim Marlow to act as tour guide, and he strikes a mostly appropriate note of reverence for the art, with just a touch of overeager nerdiness. 

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Photographs on View, From Near and Far

The Art Scene

Delicate light, soft textures and a meditative mood connect the diverse photographs on view at the Gallery Arts Guild in Lakeville. The show, called Poetry in Motion, represents the work of local photographers — among them Jonathan Doster and Marsden Epworth (editor of Compass) and young emerging artists like William Clune. Every artist in the show has a distinct point of view and arresting images.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.