Login

Art

A Painter Looks At Walmart, And Us

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

In the center of The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery someone has parked a shopping cart, the kind we push around grocery stores, except this one belongs to Walmart and is placed to dramatize the link between art and big-store commerce — the art being Brendan O’Connell’s bold, hectic canvases painted from (mostly) his photographs of Walmart.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Leaving In, Also Leaving Out

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Susan Ferrari Rowley’s sculpture is about opposites and paradoxes: yielding and unyielding materials, volume and its absence, light and shadow. Pieces seem almost weightless, fragile; yet they occupy large spaces. They are difficult at first, peculiar, almost too simple. But quickly you discover their complexity: What is absent is as important as what is there in Rowley’s glowing pieces.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Small and Telling

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Ann E. Coulter, the Illinois-based artist who Judith Singelis first brought to Argazzi Gallery several years ago, is back in Lakeville with a stunning show of her pastels. This time, however, the work is small and delicate rather than large, and it asks the viewer to come close and reflect, to consider time and nature, the past and perhaps the present.
Coulter is a master of place and mood, trees and leaves, light and shadow. Her drawings describe places and times that paradoxically seem timeless, and she hints at the changed way we perceive nature in the contemporary world.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Painting Big Ideas

The Art Scene
compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s called crowd sourcing, Brendan O’Connell says. When a company or, say, a government has a problem, it broadens the search and asks the public for help.
This painter says he is doing something like that.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Words & Drawings

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Who knew cartooning was such hard work? Peter Steiner and three cartoonist friends, all regular contributors to The New Yorker, made clear just how hard it is last Sunday in a lively, interesting and entertaining Sharon Town Hall presentation that preceded the opening of a delightful exhibition of their work at Sharon Library.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Surprises at Noble Show

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Noble Horizons’ 40th Invitational Art Show is quite strong, perhaps because the nine artists exhibiting were limited to only a few pieces, which have been hung in congenial and complementary groupings.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Too Old To Share

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

If you want to feel really old and out of touch, by all means visit “Thanks For Sharing,” the new visual show at the Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery. Perhaps you, too, will wander through the mercifully small show looking for something familiar, something you understand, something to glom on to. Good luck.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

About People and Art

Body Art: Part II
compass@lakevillejournal.com

Diane Love is an adventurous and canny woman, ready to drop one idea when a better one comes along.
Here’s what I mean. One day she was setting her telescopic camera lens on early Roman sculptures in a Berlin museum. This was her latest project, photographing works of art. So she had her Nikon F3 trained on these venerable figures, and just as she hit the shutter another museum-goer leaned into the frame to get a better look at the busts.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

End-of-Summer Art In Lime Rock

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

One of the rewards of visiting Trinity Episcopal Church's annual end-of-summer art show is to see how some local artists have developed since the last exhibition. Tina Chandler, for example, now paints pastels on “constructed” surfaces: Small squares of board are glued onto a larger surface, then she paints both on and around the resulting grid. You'll think you are looking through window panes at her landscapes.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.

Like Chapters in a Book

The Art Scene
leong@lakevillejournal.com

Cleve Gray was 60 years old in 1978 and must surely have been considering aging when he painted most of the pictures in his “Perne” series, now on exhibition in Kent’s Morrison Gallery.
The title comes from William Butler Yeats’s great poem, “Sailing to Byzantium,” which begins, “That is no country for old men.”
For Yeats the great city, which he never saw, represented eternal life on earth through art and architecture; and he invoked its great sages — perning, or spinning, in a gyre — to gather him and his art into eternity.

Full text available to premium subscribers only. Log in or Create an account.

Once you've created an account, you will be given a free 30-day subscription to the site where you can view all content unrestricted. After 30 days, you can extend your account by purchasing a subscription.

If you are already a print subscriber, click here to give us your contact information, and we will confirm your active subscription and give you a password to access the website.