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Haughty Birds, Stunning Bulls

The Art Scene: Leon Graham

Peter Woytuck is back at the Morrison Gallery in Kent, CT, with a charming show that mixes small sculptures with a few larger ones. While all the usual Woytuck subjects — animals, fruits, tools — are here, they are cast in surprising sizes, arrangements, even materials.
Woytuck, who now spends most of his time in Thailand, put together the show while going through cast bronze and other pieces in his Kent workshop several weeks ago. “It was impromptu, kind of like 3D sketching,” he told Billy Morrison, the gallery’s owner.

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Once Again, Mead and Eagle Bring Their Adventures Home

The Arts Scene

If you loved the documentary film, “March of the Penguins” — and who would admit they had not— then the photographs in Ultimate Antarctica are for you. Dan Meade and Sally Eagle, intrepid world travelers and photographers for more than 30 years, are showing a small group of images at the Salisbury School, all from a cruise they took to Antarctica several years ago.

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The Arts Gain Stature At Indian Mountain School

Art Scene

Indian Mountain School has opened its new Student Center with an inaugural show of work from 24 artists, most with connections to the school as former students, parents or faculty. While the art is uneven, the building is a star.

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Fine and Varied Photographs At Noble Horizons

The Art Scene

The Housatonic Camera Club’s annual exhibition at Noble Horizons seems better this year, tighter and more interesting.
Most members have displayed work centered on a single theme, which allows for a deeper exploration of both subject and technique.
Bert Schmitz’s images of African animals are intimate.
In one, six zebras are grouped together in stunning black and white.

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Eternal, Detailed And Fascinating

The Art Scene

Eternal Light, Hudson Light is a small, fascinating exhibition in The Moviehouse gallery in Millerton. Artists Martha and Murray Zimiles, while seemingly worlds apart in subject and technique, are both concerned with light and transcendence and the sublime.

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Turning a Great Trek Into Fine Art

The Art Scene

Robert Andrew Parker’s show, “A Trek in the Himalaya,” is a coup for Sharon’s Hotchkiss Library. Parker, now 86, is the famous artist whose illustrations have appeared in many magazines — Sports Illustrated, The New Yorker, Seventeen among others — and in more than 100 children’s books.

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Fine Work, Old and New, At the White Gallery

The Art Scene

The White Gallery’s 11th annual Artful Season holiday show is a holiday stocking with pieces by new artists, several extraordinary.
Two works by Emma Kindall are complex yet accessible. Working with oil, paper, charcoal, pencil and twigs, all in shades of brown, white gray and black, she captures the meaning of home, with people living in tilting or deteriorating structures. In “Pacing Bugs” a tenement house teems with life, while the family in “October House” seems oblivious to its deterioration. These are powerful comments on our times.

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Jane Martin’s Women. . . Mysterious, Seductive, Ambiguous

The Art Scene

Artist Jane Martin is fascinated with the power and mystery of the female body, with the historical feminization of nature and with those especially calm moments before a show of nature’s ferocity. In her exhibition at The Hotchkiss School’s Tremaine Gallery, all are explored in gorgeous photographs, abstract paintings and a video.

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Beautiful and Restrained

Art Scene

Since her first show in Falls Village in 2002, Karen LeSage has presented her paintings in 20 exhibits, some group, most solo. Five shows sold out, a record few other local artists can claim. The reasons are several, I suspect.
LeSage’s pictures are beautiful in an almost shy, unassuming way. They recall, some might say too closely, the abstract color field landscapes of Mark Rothko’s early career. And like the Rothkos, there are hidden depths in the paintings. But where Rothko was bold, assertive, insistent, LeSage is gentle, somewhat passive, restrained. And lighter.

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A Show With a Poignant Theme. . . Remembering the Twin Oaks in Sharon

The Art Scene

Juried art shows are odd animals. For artists, especially local ones who make art for pleasure more than for sales, the shows offer public exposure and the hope of a prize, even a minor one, that rarely comes.

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