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Art

Bronzes Will Make You Smile

Art: ‘Peter Woytuck: Unique 2017’

Peter Woytuck is back, but only long enough to put together a delightful show of small bronzes that will open at Argazzi Art in Lake­ville on Saturday, July 22.
In person, Woytuck is soft spoken, a little shy, with an “aw shucks” demeanor like a schoolboy — until he talks about making and patinating his sculptures. You can almost see the blowtorch in his hand, the pigment ready to brush on hot metal; almost hear and feel him polishing for his lustrous finishes.

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Juried art show in Kent

 
The Kent Art Association’s Juried Presidents Show is on display through Aug. 6 at 21 South Main St. in Kent. It is open Thursday through Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. Two judges, artists Ann Kromer of Ridgefield and Paul Gould of Cornwall, selected the winners in each of several categories. Above, KAA President Connie Horton, left, presented the award for Best in Show to Laura Pulatti. For details, go to www.kentart.org or call 860-927-3989.

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A Truly Eye-Opening Tour

compass@lakevillejournal.com

It’s fascinating to watch artists work in their own studios. Rather than simply looking at a painting on a wall or a piece of jewelry on a rack, you get to watch the creative process of the artist. You can ask questions. And in the end, you might feel more connected to the finished product after catching a glimpse at its creation.

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An Art Tour Of NYC: Museums And Mutations

My wife and daughter were out of town last month. My sister called to tell me that she and my brother-in-law were going away for the weekend and to invite me to stay in their New York City apartment. I haven’t been on my own in the city since I lived there and was single, so I jumped at the chance.
As it happened, the first person I mentioned my plans to was Leon Graham, Compass’s resident art critic. He immediately laid out a list of art-related places to go and things to see. So now my weekend had a theme.

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Kent To NYC, Figures Bring Joy

The New Yorker magazine called the figures “zaftig … like Teletubbies that grew up.” Their installation on New York City’s Broadway Mall — a linear park that extends from 70th Street to 168th — overnight in mid-May caused hurrying West Siders to stop and gawk, then smile with surprise. Many touched or even sat on some of the nine sculptures.

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Triangles Transform From Shapes To Art

Art: ‘Kate Stiassni: Spatial Relations’

Kate Stiassni continues pushing the boundaries of contemporary fabric art in her new show, “Spatial Relations,” at The White Gallery in Lakeville. Her usual vibrant colors are there, but so is a new concern for the relationship of her abstract figures to each other and to the empty space around them.

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Crafting Unique Stories With Shadows And Found Objects

Art: Conrad Levenson’s ‘Forms and Shadows’

Each sculpture by Conrad Levenson tells a story. The Stanfordville artist takes found objects — rusty pieces of metal, chains, discarded tools — and gives them a new life.
“I have all these objects and I respond to what they’re telling me,” he said while setting up his solo exhibition at North Elm Home, a furnishing and antiques store in Millerton. “Usually I take objects with no prior relationship to each other and then bring them together in one piece. That’s part of the fun.”

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Inspired By A Millerton Landscape

Art

The rangy fellow in an Orvis cap standing by an easel behind the Re Institute in Millerton these days is Tom Goldenberg, age 68. His subject is the Taconic range, he tells me. With a sweeping gesture he points south to north where distant layers of gneiss and schist and marble are blanketed by fields, forests and wild grasses tall enough to shimmy in the morning wind.

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Juried Exhibits Held In Northwest Corner

Art

Multiple juried art shows are in various stages of exhibition throughout the Northwest Corner. These shows offer the perfect opportunity to enjoy the works of local artists, as well as give these artists the chance to receive recognition for their work.
Lakeville

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A Powerful Homage to the River

Art

Frank Bramble is a lover and protector of the Housatonic River. 
For many years the Torrington resident has hiked its banks, fished its cold water and contemplated its place within its beautiful natural surroundings. But now he is worried that the river, like much of our natural environment, is challenged and endangered.  

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